ANALYSIS OF ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING BY THE TEACHERS AND STUDENTS OF ACHARYA N G RANGA AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY – AN EXPLORATORY STUDY

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Date
2022-08-04
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guntur
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The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in closure of schools and colleges for months together across the world, situations are unpredictable to reopen the educational institutes and this paved the way for online teaching and learning. An exploratory study was planned and conducted to analyze the online education in Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University. This research was taken up to study the profile of teachers and students, their attitude and competencies in online teaching and learning, constraints faced by them. The best practices in online teaching and learning were documented. The study was conducted during 2020-21 using exploratory research design. Two Agricultural Colleges viz., Agricultural College, Bapatla and S V Agricultural College, Tirupati were selected for the study. From each of the selected Agricultural College 30 teachers, 30 Post Graduate students and 90 Under Graduate students (30 each from 2nd, 3rd, 4th year of B. Sc. (Hons.) Agriculture) involved in online teaching and learning were selected using simple random sampling procedure, thus making a total sample of 60 teachers, 60 Post Graduate students and180 Under Graduate students. Less than two-third of the teachers were observed in middle (60.00%) age group, 58.33 per cent were male, 91.67 per cent possessed Ph. D qualification, 48.33 per cent were professors, 73.34 per cent had teaching experience of >12 years, 18.33 per cent of the teachers had previous experience in online teaching, only 16.67 had undergone training in online teaching for more than one week, 66.67 per cent used Zoom as video conferencing application in online teaching, cent per cent of the teachers possess smart phones, 53.33 per cent teachers often used personal laptops for online teaching. Three-fourth of the teachers had access to good internet connectivity (75.00%) and 63.33 per cent had sufficient internet data & speed. Less than half of the teachers spent 8-12 hours per week in preparation for online teaching (43.33%) while 46.67 per cent spent 13-16 hours per week in online teaching. More than one-third of the teachers reported that xv attendance of students was 80-89% (38.33%), about 55.00 per cent shared learning material as PPT and word, half of the teachers shared reading material immediately after the class, 70.00 per cent used official meeting ID, 98.33 per cent used PPT regularly for online classes. Less than two-third of the teachers had medium favourable attitude (65.00%). By applying factor analysis, six major factors were extracted having Eigen value greater than one which were explaining a total variance of 69.17 per cent towards the attitude of teachers towards online teaching. Less than two-third of the teachers were perceived as medium competent (61.67%) in online teaching. Among the different constraints faced by the teachers in online teaching, problem with application was ranked I by garret ranking method, followed by lack of expertise and skills, internet connectivity issues, lack of infrastructure facilities in department (webcam, laptop, headphones, etc.,), lack of students’ response, increased workload, heath issues (eyes strain, body pains, etc.,) and students’ login all through the class. Less than two-third of the teachers were satisfied (60.00%) with online teaching. More than half of the UG students (54.44%) and PG students (63.33%) belonged to 20-25 years age group. More than two-third of the UG students (68.89%) and PG students (58.33%) were female. More than half of the UG students (59.00%) and PG students (46.67%) belonged to rural background. More than three-fourth of the UG students (77.22%) and PG students (83.33%) completed their secondary school education in private school. Majority of the UG students (84.44%) and PG students (83.33%) were from nuclear families. Less than half of the UG students (43.89%) and PG students (43.33%) parental occupation was farming. More than half of the UG students (58.89%) and PG students (43.34%) per cent secured 8.1-9.0 GPA. Greater proportion of the UG (96.11%) students and PG students (98.33%) possess smart phone. More than half of the PG students had access to good internet connectivity (56.67%) while 42.78 per cent of the UG students had access to good internet connectivity. Less than half of the PG students had sufficient internet data (46.67%) while 40.00 per cent of the UG students had sufficient internet data. Greater proportion of the UG students often (92.78%) used smart phone for online learning, followed by laptop (5.00%), tablet (3.33%) and personal computer (2.22%). Greater proportion of the PG students often (90.00%) used smart phone for online learning, followed by laptop (48.33%) and equal proportion of 5.00 per cent each used tablet and personal computer. Less than half of the PG students spent 9-18 hours per week (48.34%) in online classes. While 41.67 per cent of the UG students spent 19-28 hours per week in online classes. More than three-fourth of the UG students had medium favourable attitude (79.44%) while 73.33 per cent of the PG students had medium favourable attitude. It was evident from the Z test that there exists a significant difference between the attitude of UG and PG students. By applying factor analysis, six major factors were extracted having eigen value greater than one which were explaining a total variance of 58.84 per cent towards the attitude of students towards online learning. More than two-third of the UG students were perceived as medium competent (68.89%) while 55.00 per cent of the PG students were perceived as medium competent in online learning. It was evident from the Z test that there exists no significant difference between the competency of UG and PG students in online learning. xvi Among the different constraints faced by the students in online learning, UG students ranked lack of knowledge on effective use of online apps as the major problem by garret ranking method, followed by internet connectivity issues, problem with application, lack of expertise and skills in using the apps, unfavourable learning environment, time consuming, lack of uninterrupted power supply, health issues like eye strain, body pains etc., and expensive. While PG students reported that unfavourable learning environment as the major problem, followed by lack of knowledge on effective use of online apps, lack of expertise and skills in using the apps, problem with application, time consuming, internet connectivity issues, lack of uninterrupted power supply, expensive and health issues like eye strain, body pains etc. More than one-third of the UG students were satisfied (34.44%) with online learning whereas 48.33 per cent of the PG students were satisfied with online learning. The best practices documented in online learning were creating an organized study space, active participation, eliminating distractions, recording online lectures, maintaining notes, taking breaks in between the classes, managing the time for all works, intrinsic motivation and accountable in online classes. The best practices documented in online teaching were training on digital tools, improving student engagement by interacting and using different techniques, designing of course, easy access to students, developing online etiquettes, innovative teaching methods, active online presence, respond fast to queries with lively examples, assess student performance timely and providing feedback. Providing institutional infrastructure and internet facilities, training on ICTs, establishing smart class rooms, developing Learning Management System (LMS) with all the required features, incorporating ICT in curriculum are the institutional interventions in online teaching and learning.
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ANALYSIS OF ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING BY THE TEACHERS AND STUDENTS OF ACHARYA N G RANGA AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY – AN EXPLORATORY STUDY
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