Skip navigation
Beta Version

Thesis

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS ENRICHMENT OF BROILER CHICKEN MEAT THROUGH DIETARY MANIPULATIONS

5
0

Attachments [ 1 ]

More Details

2014-12-09
Dr. V. CHINNI PREETAM
PVNR TVU
D;407
Ph.D

The experiment was conducted to enrich the omega-3 fatty acids in chicken meat through dietary manipulations and to study their effect on performance, carcass traits, biochemical parameters and shelf life of chicken meat. For this purpose, 280 day-old commercial male broiler chicks were randomly divided into seven dietary groups with eight replicates of five birds each (7x8x5) and reared in battery brooders up to 42 days of age following standard management and vaccination schedule. The broilers were fed prestarter (0-11 days), starter (12-21 days) and finisher (22-42 days) diets. The corn-soya based control diet (T1) was prepared with sunflower oil (SFO) and diets for remaining treatment groups (T2- T7) were formulated by replacing sunflower oil with different levels of linseed oil (LO) and fish oil (FO). The experimental design consists of T1 - Control diet with sunflower oil, T2 - linseed oil @ 33% of sunflower oil, T3 - linseed oil @ 67% of sunflower oil, T4 - linseed oil @ 100%, T5 - fish oil @ 33% of sunflower oil, T6 - fish oil @ 67% of sunflower oil and T7 - fish oil @ 100%. The results indicated that there was significant (P<0.05) influence on the body weight gains of broilers between all the treatment groups throughout the study period. Significantly (P<0.05) higher body weight gains were recorded for 100 percent LO (T4) or FO (T7) fed group and lower for 33 percent replacement of SFO with LO (T2) or FO (T5) group. Feed consumption was not significantly (P>0.05) influenced by the supplementation of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid sources whereas, FCR was significantly (P<0.05) influenced due to the treatment groups throughout the experimental period. The overall FCR was better for 100 percent LO (T4) group followed by 100 percent FO (T7) group. All the groups did not show any significant (P>0.05) effect on carcass traits like dressing yield, breast yield, liver and giblet percentage, whereas abdominal fat percentage was significantly (P<0.05) influenced. Significantly (P<0.05) lower abdominal fat was observed for 67 percent and 100 percent replacement groups of either LO or FO while higher abdominal fat was recorded for SFO fed control group (T1). No significant (P<0.05) difference on abdominal fat content was noticed between LO and FO groups. The protein and fat contents of breast muscle were significantly (P<0.05) influenced by the dietary inclusion of LO and FO. The protein content was lower for SFO fed control group (T1) and higher for 100 percent LO, 67 and 100 percent FO fed groups. The fat content linearly decreased with graded replacement of either LO or FO except T2 (33% LO). The higher fat content was observed for SFO fed control group (T1) and lower for 100 percent LO (T4) or FO (T7) groups. Significant (P<0.05) influence was noticed for thigh muscle protein and fat content. The protein content was lower for SFO based control group (T1) and higher for 67 and 100 percent FO fed groups. The fat content was lower at 67 (T3) and 100 percent (T4) replacement levels of LO and higher for SFO based control group (T1). The dietary addition of LO and FO significantly (P<0.05) influenced the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) content of liver, breast and thigh muscle, where significantly (P<0.05) highest concentration of TBA in liver was observed in 100 percent (T7) FO fed group. The TBA values of breast meat linearly increased with graded replacement of SFO either by LO or FO whereas in thigh meat, the TBAvalues were linearly increased with the graded levels of LO. Highest concentrations of TBA for breast and thigh meat were observed for 100 percent FO (T7) group followed by 100 percent LO (T4) group. Significant (P<0.05) influence was noticed on serum lipid peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzyme activity. Lipid peroxidase enzyme activity increased linearly with the graded levels of LO and FO supplementation and the highest concentration was observed for 100 percent LO (T4) group. Superoxide dismutase activity decreased linearly with increasing the level of LO and FO in the diet and the lowest concentration was observed in 100 percent FO based diet (T7). Significantly (P<0.05) lower values of serum triglycerides and total cholesterol were noticed in 100 percent LO (T4) and FO (T7) groups, whereas HDL cholesterol values were significantly (P<0.05) higher for 100 percent FO fed group (T7). The total saturated fatty acids (TSFA) and Total MUFA content of breast and thigh meat was significantly (P<0.05) higher in SFO fed control group, whereas the n-6 PUFA content was significantly (P<0.05) higher in both LO and FO fed groups and n-3 PUFA was higher in FO fed group. The overall n-6 to n-3 ratio was lower for both LO and FO fed groups compared to SFO fed control group. The supplementation of n-3 fatty acid sources had no significant (P<0.05) influence on sensory attributes of meat such as appearance, flavor, juiciness, texture and overall acceptability up to 3.9 percent inclusion of either LO or FO. Hence, it can be concluded that supplementation of n-3 FA (LO or FO) sources at the level of 3.9 percent enhanced PUFA content in meat without altering sensory attributes and did not cause any adverse effects on performance of broilers. It also reduced abdominal fat, serum triglycerides and total cholesterol while improving HDL cholesterol levels.

Comments

(Leave your comments here about this item.)

Item Analytics

Item Views and Downloads

Geographical spread of Visitors

Country City Visitors