Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://krishikosh.egranth.ac.in/handle/1/67029
Authors: HARIKRISHNA, PAILA
Advisor: LAKSHMI PATHY, R.
Title: UTILIZATION OF MAIZE STALKS FOR MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND COMPOST MAKING
Publisher: ACHARYA N. G. RANGA AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY
Language: en
Type: Thesis
Series/Report no.: ;D9268
Agrotags: mud, diseases, viruses, colourants, livestock, papayas, fungi, iaa, iris
MAIZE STALKS, MUSHROOM
Abstract: The study entitled “UTILIZATION OF MAIZE STALKS FOR MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND COMPOST MAKING” was conducted during 2012-13 at, Post Harvest Technology Centre, Bapatla, A.P. Aim of this research work was to evaluate feasibility of maize stalks for oyster mushroom cultivation as that of paddy straw and sorghum stalks and also, to evaluate maize stalks and maize stalks after mushroom cultivation for composting and vermicomposting. In the first experiment, to evaluate maize stalks for mushroom cultivation, there were 6 treatments viz., 100% maize straw, 100% sorghum straw, 100% paddy straw, 50% maize straw + 50% paddy straw, 50% sorghum straw + 50% paddy straw, 50% maize straw + 50% sorghum straw. Oyster mushroom yield and bioefficiency was more in 100% paddy straw, but the differences in mushroom yield and bioefficiency between the treatments were on par with each other. Difference in mushroom pin head initiation was recorded between the different substrates and their combinations used. Mushroom pin heads were formed soon in case of 50% sorghum stalk + 50% paddy straw (22 days). Moisture content of the fresh mushroom varied between different substrates and was highest in case of mushrooms harvested from 50% maize stalk + 50% paddy straw (88.91%). There was variation in protein content, total amino acids, total sugars, phenolic content, crude fibre content, ash content and calorific value of oyster mushrooms were statistically differed among the treatments. Highest protein content (26.83%), total sugars (46.13%), calorific value (8.67 Kj/g) and ash content (7.93%) were recorded in the mushrooms harvested from 100% maize stalk. Amino acid content (22.63mg/g) and pH (6.53) were more in the mushrooms harvested from 50% sorghum stalk + 50% paddy straw. Highest phenolic content (0.59mg/g) was recorded in the mushrooms harvested from 100% sorghum stalk. Highest crude fibre content was recorded in mushrooms harvested from 100% paddy straw (10.83%). In another experiment fresh maize stalks and maize stalks after mushroom cultivation (Spent mushroom substrates) were utilized for composting by treating them with Phanerochete chrysosporium (PC) +Trichurus spiralis and earth worms. During composting there was a variation in the population of microorganisms, nutrient content, pH and temperature at different stages. Microbial population varied significantly between the substrates and treatments of composting process. The population of microorganisms increased up to 20th day of composting in all the treatments and then decreased. Nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium contents in the mushroom spent substrate (0.98 %, 0.19 %, 0.78 %) were more compared to fresh maize stalks (0.7 %, 0.17 %, 0.72%, respectively). These nutrients slightly increased during composting process. But the rate of increase in nutrients content was more in case of vermicomposts compared to other treatments. N, P, K contents were more in the composts prepared from mushroom spent substrate compared to fresh maize stalks in all the stages and in all treatments. But it is quite opposite in case of organic carbon and C : N ratio. The organic carbon content and C : N ratio slightly decreased during composting process in all the treatments at all the stages of composting. Compost recovery was more in maize stalk untreated (487.3g/500g) and least in case of maize stalk after mushroom production+ earth worms (278.3g./500g.). The multiplication rate of earthworms is more in case of mushroom spent substrate (572%) compared to fresh maize stalk (400%). Regarding the pile temperature during composting, it increased up to 3rd week and then decreased. Maximum pile temperatures were recorded in the treatment with maize stalk after mushroom production + Phanerochete chrysosporium + Trichurus spiralis (44.2OC). Key words: maize stalks, sorghum stalks, paddy straw, oyster mushroom, mushroom spent substrate, composting, vermin composting, earth worms, fungal culture.
Subject: Agricultural Microbiology
These Type: M.SC
Issue Date: 2013
Appears in Collections:Theses

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