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Agriculture University, Jodhpur

Agriculture University, Jodhpur was established on 14th September, 2013 by Government of Rajasthan under Agriculture University, Jodhpur Act 21 of 2013 to focus on holistic development of arid and semi-arid regions of the state covering 6 districts (Jodhpur, Barmer, Nagaur, Pali, Jalore and Sirohi), constituting 28% of total geographical area which is sustaining 20.8% human and 28.4% animal population of the state. The districts under jurisdiction of the university cover 3 agro-ecological zones of the state. These are Arid Western Plain Zone Ia (Jodhpur and Barmer districts), Transitional plain of Luni Basin Zone IIb (Jalore, Pali, and Sirohi districts) and part of Transitional Plain of Inland Drainage Zone IIa (Nagaur district). The university has 1 institute of diploma and 3 colleges to produce highly competent educated human resources in agriculture and allied sciences besides 2 agricultural research stations, one each in zone Ia & IIb and 3 agricultural research sub stations, one in each zone to prepare, plan and perform highly need based research in this acute water scarce but naturally rich bio-diversified zone of the country. The third most important part in tri-pillar (Teaching, Research & Extension) of agricultural development, the extension for transfer of technologies are reached to doorsteps of the farming community by 6 Krishi Vigyan Kendras (K-V-Ks), 2 in Nagaur district and 1 each in Jodhpur, Barmer, Jalore & Sirohi districts under the umbrella of the university. The different units of teaching, research and extension are coordinating to systematically run by the headquarter situated at Mandor, Jodhpur.

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  • ThesisItemUnknown
    Population Dynamics of Insect Pests and Management of Aphid, Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) in Mustard
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2022-07-25) PRATIHAR, AKSHAY KUMAR SINGH; Sundria, M. M.; Pandey, Shalini; Bhardwaj, Rahul
    The investigation on “Population Dynamics of Insect Pests and Management of Aphid, Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) in Mustard” under semi-arid condition was carried out in Rabi, 2021-22 at Research Farm of Agricultural Research Station, Mandor, Jodhpur. The aphid infestation was initiated from 51st SMW and the peak activity (126.20 aphid/10 cm terminal shoot) on 4th SMW. After that progressive decline was observed. The painted bug infestation was observed two times, where it was initiated early on 45th SMW and no infestation during from 2nd SMW to 7th SMW. Its infestation was occurred again at 8th SMW and reached to peak level (5.13 bugs/plant) at 10th SMW. The flea beetle infestation was initiated from 1st SMW and continued till 8th SMW. Peak activity on 4th SMW (0.93 beetles/plant) and then gradually declined. The leaf webber infestation was initiated from 48th SMW and reached to peak activity (2.87 larvae/plant) on 6th SMW. Natural enemy i.e., Coccinella septempunctata appeared in 1st SMW and peak activity was noticed on 8th SMW. Mustard aphid, flea beetle and leaf webber were significantly negative correlated with minimum temp. While, ladybird beetle was significantly positive with minimum temp. and sunshine, also. Painted bug and ladybird beetle both were significantly positive with maximum temp. and average temperature whereas, aphid had significantly negative with average temperature. Morning RH correlated significant positive with aphid. While, significant negative relation of ladybird beetle with morning and avg. RH. Painted bug was significant negative correlation with evening RH and avg. temperature. There was no significant relation with rainfall. Ten genotypes/varieties of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) were screened against mustard aphid, the results revealed that TM 108-1, Kranti and Bio 902 were found as resistant, TM 267-3, TM 316, TM 304-1, RH 749, PM 31 and GDM 4 were identified as the moderately resistant while LS-FF-57 was found as tolerant.Ten genotypes/varieties of Yellow sarson (Brassica rapa) were screened against mustard aphid, the results revealed that MYS-152, YSH-401 and NRCYS 05- 02 were found as resistant, RMYS-1, RMYS-2, RMYS-3, MYS-180, MYS-183, Jhumka and Pitambari were identified as moderately resistant. Ten genotypes/varieties of five different Brassica species were screened against mustard aphid, the results revealed that none of the genotypes/varieties were found as resistant. Tapeshwari, Bhawani, Pusa Swarna, Pusa Aaditya, MBT-27, MBT-4 and GP 115-1 were identified as the moderately resistant whereas, varieties MN-1, Karantara and RTM-1351 were found as tolerant. The treatment of imidacloprid 17.8 SL was found most effective followed by thiamethoxam 25 WG and dimethoate 30 EC while, treatments of diafenthiuron 50 WP and chlorpyriphos 20 EC as least effective. The maximum yield of 3861 kg/ha was recorded in the plot treated with imidacloprid 17.8 SL followed by thiamethoxam 25 WG (3444 kg/ha) and dimethoate 30 EC (3194 kg/ha). Maximum net profit of Rs. 2,00,290 ha-1 was obtained from imidacloprid 17.8 SL. The highest B: C ratio of computed in imidacloprid 17.8 SL (6.38:1) followed by 5.60:1 in thiamethoxam 25 WG and 4.99:1 in dimethoate 30 EC while, minimum (2.71:1) was obtained in chlorpyriphos 20 EC.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Bio-efficacy of Sorghum Extract and Herbicide on Growth, Yield and Quality of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2022-07-20) KIKRALIYA, DEVI LAL; Shukla, U.N.; Mehriya, M.L.; Raiger, P.R.
    Bio-efficacy of Sorghum Extract and Herbicide on Growth, Yield and Quality of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Devi Lal Kikraliya* (Scholar) Dr. U.N. Shukla** (Major advisor) ABSTRACT A field experiment entitled “Bio-efficacy of sorghum extract and herbicide on growth, yield and quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)” was conducted at Instructional Farm, College of Agriculture, Jodhpur (Rajasthan) during rabi season of 2021-22. Field experiment was laid out in randomized block design (RBD) with eleven treatment combinations and replicated thrice. The treatments taken in the investigation were W1-sorghum extract (1:1), W2- Sorghum extract (1:2), W3- Sorghum extract (1:3), W4-Sorghum extract (1:4), W5-Ready mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha, W6-Sorghum extract (1:1) + ready-mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha, W7- Sorghum extract (1:2) + ready-mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha, W8- Sorghum extract (1:3) + ready-mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha, W9- Sorghum extract (1:4) + ready-mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha, W10- Weed free and W11- Weedy check. According to treatments, different ratio of sorghum extract applied either alone or with ready-mix herbicide. Results indicated that post-emergence and sequential application of sorghum extract (1:3) + ready-mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha (W8) significantly reduced weed density and dry weight of C. murale L., C. album L., Rumex dentatus L., Asphodelus tenuifolius L. and Cyperus rotundus L. results in obtaining higher weed control efficiency at all the growth stages of crop that improved weed index and also lesser nutrient removals (N, P, K) recorded at 60 DAS and at harvest. Owing to reduction in weed infestation which improved growth attributes viz. final plant population including tillers (442/m2 ) at harvest, plant height (51.69, 83.72 and 90.49 cm), number of tillers (464, 453 and 442/m2 ), dry matter accumulation (374.24, 781.46 and 964.44 g/m2 ) at 60, 90 and at harvest, respectively, while SPAD chlorophyll meter reading (51.23 and 50.09) was significantly recorded at 60 and 90 DAS, respectively due to application of sorghum extract (1:3) + ready mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha (W8) as compared to their higher concentration of sorghum extracts applied either alone or with ready-mix herbicide including weedy check (W11) during field experimentation at all growth stages except 30 DAS, where none of the treatments showed significant effects. Similarly, significantly higher number of effective tillers (414/m2 ), length of spike (17.50 cm), number of grains/spike (43.33) and 1000-grain weight (44.45 g) were recorded under post-emergence and sequential application of sorghum extract (1:3) + ready-mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha (W8) resulted in production of higher grain yield (4543 kg/ha.), straw yield (5103 kg/ha.) and biomass yield (9646 kg/ha.) and also showed their efficacy in recording higher protein yield (438 kg/ha) and contents of N, P and K in grains and straw as well as their uptakes by wheat. Improved in grain yield that resulted in higher monetary advantages in terms of gross return (`1,20,351/ha), net return (` 87,830/ha) and B: C ratio (3.70) by the application of sorghum extract (1:3) + ready-mix of clodinafop + metsulfuron 64 g/ha (W8) as compared to weedy check (W11). Among alone application of sorghum extracts, application of sorghum extracts (1:3) significantly reduces weeds and recorded higher growth, yield attributes, yield, nutrients uptakes and economics as well as higher microbial population as compared weedy check (W11).
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Evaluation of Different Species and Substrates for Cultivation of Oyster (Pleurotus spp.) Mushroom
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2022-07-11) Khan, Ajjad; Ram, Dama; Verma, Jeeva Ram; Singh, L. Netajit
    Mushroom is a large macroscopic fruiting body of fleshy, spore-bearing, multi-cellular edible fungi belong to division Basidiomycota. It is widely used in both food and medicine, it is a rich source of protein, vitamins and minerals. The effect of different media on the growth of Pleurotus spp. In vitro, different media (PDA, MEA, REA, and OMA) were evaluated to find out optimum medium for growth of Pleurotus species. The study on the effect of four media on the growth of oyster mushrooms indicated that the mycelial growth of P. eryngii was significantly more on oat meal agar (86.00 mm). However, minimum mycelial growth (40.00 mm) was observed on rice extract agar media. In case of P. sajor-caju the maximum mycelial growth was observed on oat meal agar (90.00 mm) and malt extract agar (90.00 mm) media, which was at par with each other, while minimum mycelial growth (65.00 mm) was observed on rice extract agar medium, and in case of P. sapidus the maximum mycelial growth was recorded on oat meal agar media (90.00 mm) and potato dextrose agar media (90.00) was at par with each other after 8 days of inoculation, while minimum mycelial growth (35.00 mm) was observed on rice extract agar media. The effect of the different substrates viz., wheat straw, sorghum straw, mustard straw, pearl millet straw and wheat + sorghum straw were evaluated for cultivation of oyster mushroom in the present study. In all three species namely P. eryngi, P. sajor-caju and P. sapidus, wheat straw showed the fastest spawn run, pin head formation, fruiting bodies formation, and minimum days required for first, second and third harvesting of mushroom followed by mustard straw, while maximum days for mycelium formation was observed on pearl millet straw. The total yield and biological efficiency, in case of P. eryngii the maximum total yield and biological efficiency was observed on wheat straw (698.33g and 69.83 per cent), while minimum total yield and biological efficiency was observed on pearl millet straw (576.69g and 57.69 per cent). In case of P. sajor-caju the maximum total yield and biological efficiency was observed on wheat straw (787.12.g and 78.71 per cent), while minimum total yield and biological efficiency was observed on pearl millet straw (590.45g and 59.04 per cent). In case of P. sapidus the maximum total yield and biological efficiency was observed on wheat straw (546.99g and 54.69 per cent), while minimum total yield and biological efficiency was observed on sorghum straw (398.45g and 39.84 per cent). The benefit: cost ratio, the maximum benefit: cost ratiofor P. sajor-caju was observed on mustard straw (5.96:1) followed by pearl millet straw (4.47:1) and wheat straw (3.56:1) while minimum benefit: cost ratio was observed on wheat + sorghum straw (3.25:1). In P. eryngii, maximum benefit: cost ratio was reported on mustard straw (5.86:1) followed by pearl millet straw (4.38:1) and wheat straw (3.55:1) while minimum benefit: cost ratio was observed on wheat + sorghum straw (3.25:1). In P. sapidus, maximum benefit: cost ratio was found on mustard straw (5.80:1) followed by pearl millet straw (4.29:1) and wheat straw (3.35:1) while minimum benefit: cost ratio was observed on wheat + sorghum straw (3.10:1).
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Knowledge and Attitude of Farmers towards Crop Based Module under Farmer FIRST Programme in Jodhpur District of Rajasthan
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2021-08-06) Serawat, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra; Bhimawat, B. S.; Bairwa, K. C.
    Research study entitled “Knowledge and Attitude of Farmers towards Crop Based Module under Farmer FIRST Programme in Jodhpur District of Rajasthan” was undertaken to study the profile characteristics, knowledge, attitude level and relationship between independent variables and attitude of respondents towards crop based module under FFP. Aims to elucidate the constraints faced by the farmers and finally to formulate the strategies for effective implementation of FFP. The study was conducted in three villages of two tehsil of Jodhpur district with 107 respondents. The farmers were interviewed personally by a well-structured interview schedule. The data was coded, tabulated and analyzed by using suitable statistical tools. The profile of the respondents revealed that majority of the farmers were from middle age group, belongs to other backward class, joint family and had agriculture as main occupation. Most of them were educated up to middle level of education, categorized under medium category of land holding, were from medium annual income category and associated with one organization of social participation. The study also revealed that majority of respondents had medium level of knowledge about crop-based module under FFP. Practice wise maximum knowledge was about “High yielding varieties” and “Spacing” while minimum knowledge was reported in “Plant protection measures” and “Storage”. The results shows that majority of the farmers were found to have favourable attitude towards crop-based module. Farmer had most favourable attitude towards the statements like “I prefer HYVs to local variety as it gives high production than local variety” and “Recommended cultivation practices require regular contact with extension Workers” and less favourable attitude towards statements such as “Soil testing is not necessary for application of recommended quantity of chemical fertilizers” and “Technology advocated is not according to farmers‟ resources and their needs”. The occupation, education, size of land holding, income and social participation were found to be positive and significant and age was found to have negative significant association with the attitude level of farmers about crop-based module. While, the variables like, caste and family type were found to be positively non-significantly associated with the attitude level of farmers about crop-based module. Among the five constraints, the constraint related to “Storage constraints” was the major constraint perceived by the farmers followed by financial, marketing and general constraints. Least perceived constraints were “technical constraints”. The constraints “Unavailability of latest technology at village level” and “Lack of technical guidance” were perceived as the most and least severe technical constraints, respectively. The constraints “High labour charges” and “High cost of high yielding varieties (seed)” were perceived as most and least severe financiaconstraints, respectively. The constraints “Distress sale due to immediate need of money” and “Biasness by mandi supervisor” were perceived most and least severe marketing constraints, respectively. The constraints “Unavailability of proper storage place” and “Unavailability of gunny bags” were perceived as most and least severe storage constraints, respectively. The constraints “Natural calamities” and “Fragmented and undulated land” were perceived as most and least severe general constraints, respectivel
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Studies on Anthracnose [Colletotrichum capsici (Sydow) Butler and Bisby] of Chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) and its Management
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2020-10-08) Vijay Pal; Verma, J.R.; Ram, Dama; Singh, L.N.
    Chilli (Capsicum annuum L.), belonging to the family Solanaceae is an important spice and vegetable crop because of its massive consumption worldwide. Chilli is native of Tropical America (Brazil) and has been cultivated throughout the world including the tropics, subtropics and temperate regions. Chilli production is continuously attacked by several diseases which drastically reduces the quality and yield of fruit resulting in low returns to farmers. Among all, Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum capsici (Sydow) Butler and Bisby is one of the most important diseases, causing considerable damage, inflicting severe quantitative and qualitative losses. The disease starting from the field may be continuing even after the fruits have been harvested and kept for drying and storage. The disease is prevalent in almost all major chilli growing areas and it is reported to cause 25–48 % loss in different parts of India. The detailed studies on various aspects were carried out in the present study. A survey conducted for anthracnose disease incidence in different tehsils of Jodhpur district of Rajasthan showed that Tiwari recorded highest anthracnose disease incidence (22.02 %) followed by Bhopalgarh (19.33 %), Bawari (17.26 %), Osian (15.04 %) and least anthracnose incidence was recorded in Bilara (12.94 %). The freshly infected chilli plants showing typical anthracnose symptoms were collected from the farmer’s field and were subjected to isolation by following standard tissue isolation method and revealed the association of Colletotrichum sp. after studying the cultural and morphological characters of the fungus and the pathogenicity was proved by following Koch’s Postulates. The pure culture obtained was sent for identification to Indian Type Culture Collection (I.T.C.C.), I.A.R.I., New Delhi – 110 012 and was identified as Colletotrichum capsici (I.D. No. 11,342.20). Ten chilli cultivars were screened and none of the cultivars showed immune, resistant and highly resistant reaction under field condition. Among the fungicides screened in vitro, complete mycelial growth inhibition of C. capsici was observed in Tebuconazole 50 % + Trifloxystrobin 25 %. The lowest anthracnose severity was observed in spray with Trifloxystrobin 25 % + Tebuconazole 50 % at 1.5 ml/lit (11.55 %) under field conditions.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Studies on Alternaria Leaf Blight [Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler] of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and its Management
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur) Yadav, Pooja; Verma, J.R.; Ram, Dama; Kumawat, M.M.
    Carrot (Daucus carota L.), is most important vegetables root crop with huge medicinal, nutritional and health value. Its belongs to Apiaceae family, are cultivated worldwide. Its originated from Afghanistan is the main centre of origin. The carrot suffers from several diseases among those Alternaria leaf blight is one of the most horrible diseases are causing considerable quantities and qualitative losses in carrot. A survey conducted for Alternaria leaf blight disease incidence in different tehsils of Jodhpur district of Rajasthan showed that Tinwari, the maximum disease incidence was recorded 24.02% followed by Osian (22.66%), Lohawat (18.17%), Bawadi (13.84%). However, minimum disease incidence was recorded in Balesar Tehsil (11.74%). The freshly infected Carrot plant showing typical characteristic symptoms of leaf blight disease were collected from farmer’s field and pathogen was isolated by standard tissue isolation method and revealed the association of Alternaria sp. after studying the cultural and morphological characters of the fungus and the pathogenicity was proved by following Koch’s Postulates. The pure culture obtained was sent for identification of Indian Type Culture Collection (I.T.C.C.), I.A.R.I., New Delhi – 110 012 and was identified as Alternaria alternata (I.D. No. 11,480.21). Ten carrot cultivars were screened under cage house condition and none of the cultivars showed highly resistant and resistant reactions. The fungicides were tested in vitro condition and found difenoconazole 25% inhibited the 100% mycelial growth at all the concentrations. When applied as foliar application under cage house condition, difenoconazole 25EC at 0.25 ml/lit (11.17%) was observed lowest disease incidence. The phytoextracts, the garlic extract (68.33% & 80%) was observed to be most effective inhibiting the mycelial growth at 5% and 10% concentrations, respectively under in vitro condition against Alternaria altarnata. Among the bio-inoculants Trichoderma viride (77.13%) was found most efficient inhibiting the mycelial growth.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Studies on Blast [Pyricularia grisea (Cooke) Sacc.] of Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L) R. Br] and it’s Management
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2021-08-08) Kumar, Mukesh; Ram, Dama; Verma, J.R.; M.M., Sundria
    Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br] is a distinctive crop among the leading cereals, excellent fodder crop for livestock and staple food of the world's poor and most food insecure communities in the arid, semi-arid, tropical and sub-tropical areas of Asia and Africa. It is known through different names like Bajra, Bulrush or Spiked millet. It is a C4 cereal, belonging to family Poaceae (formerly Gramineae) and native place is central Africa. Pearl millet affected by a number of disease caused by fungus, bacteria, viruses and nematodes. Among all, pearl millet blast caused by Pyricularia grisea is one of the most important disease. The disease appears on foliage as greyish, water-soaked lesions that enlarge and become necrotic, resulting in extensive chlorosis which leads premature drying of young leaves. The annual losses in yield due to blast alone range from 1-60%. The detailed investigations on various aspects were carried out in the present study. A survey conducted for blast disease severity in different districts of Western Rajasthan showed that Nagaur recorded highest blast disease severity (43.4%) followed by Jodhpur (36.8%) , Barmer (22.4%), Jaisalmer (21.4%) and minimum disease severity was recorded in Pali (16.6%). The disease samples with characteristic symptoms were collected from the farmer’s field and were subjected to isolate by following standard tissue isolation method and revealed the association of Pyricularia grisea after studying the cultural and morphological characters of the fungus and the pathogenicity was proved by following Koch’s Postulates. Thirty-two hybrids including with one susceptible checks were screened against Pyricularia grisea pathogen, None of the cultivars showed highly resistant and resistant reaction under field condition. Among the fungicides screened in vitro, complete mycelial growth inhibition of P. grisea was observed in Tricyclazole, carbendazim 12% + mancozeb 63% and tebuconazole 50% + trifloxystrobin 25%. Chlorothalonil gave lowest effect in inhibiting the mycelia growth (46, 48& 51%) at, 1000, 1500 and 2000 ppm concentrations. Trichoderma harzianum (76.17%) was found most efficient bio-agent in inhibiting the mycelial growth of P. grisea under in vitro condition.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Exploration of Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cumini) and it’s Management
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2021-08-08) Jangir, Hitendra; Ram, Dama; Verma, J.R.; Singh, L.N.
    Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) belongs to the family Apiaceae, locally known as Jeera or Zeera. It is believed to be a native of the Mediterranean and Near Eastern regions. It is mainly cultivated in India, Egypt, Libya, Iran, Pakistan and Mexico. For the better cultivation moderate sub-tropical climate is appropriate and required cool and dry climate for better growth. It cannot withstand high humidity and heavy rainfall. For cumin cultivation well drained sandy or loamy soil is preferred and mostly grown on light textured soil deficient in nitrogen with low water retention capacity. Seed and soil borne pathogens are the major constraints in production of cumin, causing poor germination and early mortality of seedling. Cumin crop is mainly affected by three fungal (wilt, blight & powdery mildew) diseases. Wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cumini is one of the most important disease. Cumin wilt disease usually seen during early stages of crop growth to crop harvesting stage resulting in damage to the seed. The annual yield losses due to wilt disease alone are up to 60%, the disease has a potential to damage the crop with up to 25.7% but may be 60% losses in some cases, and the detailed investigations on various aspects were carried out in the present study. A roving survey carried out for wilt disease incidence in different tehsils of Jodhpur district of Rajasthan showed that Tinwari recorded maximum wilt disease incidence (21.92%) followed by Balesar (19.10%), Phalodi (17.17%), Osian (15.55%) and minimum wilt disease incidence was recorded in Bilara (12.87%). The freshly infected cumin plants showed typical wilt symptoms were collected from the farmer’s field and isolate by following standard tissue isolation method and revealed the association of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cumini after studying the cultural and morphological characters of the fungus and the pathogenicity was proved by following Koch’s Postulates. The pure culture was sent for identification to Indian Type Culture Collection (I.T.C.C.), I.A.R.I., New Delhi – 110 012 and was identified as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cumini (ID. No. 11,536.21). Thirty cumin germplasm were screened, none of the germplasm showed immune and resistant reaction under field condition.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Studies on Stem and Root Rot [Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid.] of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) and it’s Management
    (Agriculture University, Jodhpur, 2021-08-08) Bairwa, Pradip Kumar; Ram, Dama; Verma, J.R.; Kumawat, M.M.
    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is oldest oil seed crop and affected by several diseases, in which Mcrophomina phaseolina causes heavy yield losses during cropping season. It caused stem and root rot and affect plant parts during all stages of the crop growth. Pathogen having a wide host range, survive in soil as saprophytic and in form of sclerotia, and management is difficult in nature, therefore it is a major problem in sesame growing areas. The disease incidence was (15.18 - 32.74%) recorded during survey in major sesame growing areas of Western Rajasthan. The disease samples were brought to laboratory for further studies. Disease incidence was found maximum in Pali district (32.74%) followed by Jodhpur (28.39%), Nagaur (27.79%) and lowest incidence was observed in Barmer district (15.18%). Mean disease incidence was 26.00%. Pathogen was isolated from infected stem and root parts and purified by using hyphal tip cut method. Proved pathogenicity through Koch’s postulates by using seed cum soil inoculation techniques and 55.32% disease incidence was observed. Five isolates were achieved namely, AUMP-1, AUMP-2, AUMP-3, AUMP-4 and AUMP-5 identified. The variability among the different isolates of M. phaseolina was studied to determine the growth parameter and sclerotial formation of each isolate. AUMP-1 was most virulent isolate. M. phaseolina grew best at 30ºC temperature and observed maximum mycelial growth (90.00 mm) in the isolate AUMP-1under in vitro conditions. In the cultural and morphological studies, M. phaseolina was initially appeared as dirty white mycelium then turn to fluffy white to black with minute dark black sclerotia on PDA medium. The hyphal branch was at dense and feathery angles with constriction of hyphal branches at their point of origin with closed septum. The microsclerotia were dark black in colour and varied in size with 70.27 – 99.00 µm. The pycnidia was not observed on cultural media. From the study on effect of solid cultural media, the highest radial growth and excellent sclerotial formation was obtained on PDA (90.00 mm) and proved best followed by Richard’s Agar (83.63 mm) for growth of M. phaseolina