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Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur

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The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established on 12th June 1964 at Hyderabad. The University was formally inaugurated on 20th March 1965 by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India. Another significant milestone was the inauguration of the building programme of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi,the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India on 23rd June 1966. The University was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on 7th November 1996 in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga, who rendered remarkable selfless service for the cause of farmers and is regarded as an outstanding educationist, kisan leader and freedom fighter. HISTORICAL MILESTONE Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU) was established under the name of Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) on the 12th of June 1964 through the APAU Act 1963. Later, it was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on the 7th of November, 1996 in honour and memory of the noted Parliamentarian and Kisan Leader, Acharya N. G. Ranga. At the verge of completion of Golden Jubilee Year of the ANGRAU, it has given birth to a new State Agricultural University namely Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University with the bifurcation of the state of Andhra Pradesh as per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014. The ANGRAU at LAM, Guntur is serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication. Genesis of ANGRAU in service of the farmers 1926: The Royal Commission emphasized the need for a strong research base for agricultural development in the country... 1949: The Radhakrishnan Commission (1949) on University Education led to the establishment of Rural Universities for the overall development of agriculture and rural life in the country... 1955: First Joint Indo-American Team studied the status and future needs of agricultural education in the country... 1960: Second Joint Indo-American Team (1960) headed by Dr. M. S. Randhawa, the then Vice-President of Indian Council of Agricultural Research recommended specifically the establishment of Farm Universities and spelt out the basic objectives of these Universities as Institutional Autonomy, inclusion of Agriculture, Veterinary / Animal Husbandry and Home Science, Integration of Teaching, Research and Extension... 1963: The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) Act enacted... June 12th 1964: Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established at Hyderabad with Shri. O. Pulla Reddi, I.C.S. (Retired) was the first founder Vice-Chancellor of the University... June 1964: Re-affilitation of Colleges of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Hyderabad (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Osmania University), Agricultural College, Bapatla (estt. in 1945, affiliated to Andhra University), Sri Venkateswara Agricultural College, Tirupati and Andhra Veterinary College, Tirupati (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Sri Venkateswara University)... 20th March 1965: Formal inauguration of APAU by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... 1964-66: The report of the Second National Education Commission headed by Dr. D.S. Kothari, Chairman of the University Grants Commission stressed the need for establishing at least one Agricultural University in each Indian State... 23, June 1966: Inauguration of the Administrative building of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... July, 1966: Transfer of 41 Agricultural Research Stations, functioning under the Department of Agriculture... May, 1967: Transfer of Four Research Stations of the Animal Husbandry Department... 7th November 1996: Renaming of University as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga... 15th July 2005: Establishment of Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University (SVVU) bifurcating ANGRAU by Act 18 of 2005... 26th June 2007: Establishment of Andhra Pradesh Horticultural University (APHU) bifurcating ANGRAU by the Act 30 of 2007... 2nd June 2014 As per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014, ANGRAU is now... serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication...

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    EFFECT OF SEED PRIMING WITH MICRONUTRIENTS ON SEED YIELD AND QUALITY OF BLACKGRAM GENOTYPES
    (2021-09-07) SAI SUDHA, B; BAYYAPU REDDY, K.
    The present investigation was carried out in the Department of Seed Science and Technology, Advanced Post Graduate Centre, Lam, Guntur (laboratory studies) and Agricultural Research Station (ARS), Jangamaheswarapuram, Guntur (field studies) during 2019-20 to study the effect of seed priming with micronutrients on seed yield and quality of blackgram genotypes viz., Tulasi, Lam minumu and Jaladeeswara. Initially, a preliminary experiment was conducted to standardize best concentration of micronutrient and duration of priming in blackgram genotype, Tulasi. Seeds were subjected to nutripriming with various concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 %) of zinc sulphate, iron sulphate and boric acid for different durations (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h) and seed quality parameters were recorded by standard germination test using between paper method. Among all the concentrations, 0.05 % of both zinc sulphate, iron sulphate and 0.1 % boric acid were found effective in recording highest germination (%), seedling length (cm) and seedling vigour index. Irrespective of micronutrient and concentration, priming for 6 h showed improvement in all the seed quality parameters. Seeds of blackgram genotypes, Tulasi, Lam minumu and Jaladeeswara were subjected to hydropriming and nutripriming treatments with best concentration of micronutrients (0.05 % zinc sulphate, 0.05 % iron suphate and 0.1 % boric acid) for various durations (2, 4, 6 and 8 h) and tested for germination and seedling growth along with dry seed by between paper method. Results indicated that genotype, interaction of genotype × treatment, genotype × duration and genotype × treatment × duration showed non-significant influence on germination (%). Treatment, duration and their interaction exhibited significant influence on germination (%) with highest being recorded after seed priming with 0.05 % zinc sulphate for 6 h. Among all the genotypes, treatments, durations and their interactions nutripriming with 0.05 % zinc sulphate for 6 h in Tulasi showed significantly higher seedling length (cm) and seedling vigour index. xvi Seeds of blackgram genotypes viz., Tulasi, Lam minumu and Jaladeeswara were subjected to nutripriming either individually (0.05 % zinc sulphate, 0.05 % iron sulphate, 0.1 % boric acid) or in combination (0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.05 % iron sulphate, 0.05 % zinc + 0.1 % boric acid, 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid and 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid) for 6 h and shade dried to reach 9 % moisture content. Primed seeds along with dry seed were evaluated for seed quality and field parameters. Analysis of variance of results disclosed that blackgram genotype, Tulasi and nutripriming with combination of 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid recorded highest improvement in all seed quality parameters. In field studies, nutripriming with combination of 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid in Tulasi showed best improvement for all field parameters viz., plant height at 25, 50 DAS and at maturity, number of branches per plant, number of pods per plant, seed yield per plant and seed yield per plot. Nutripriming with combination of 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid followed by 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid in Tulasi showed advancement in days to 50 % flowering. Treatments that included zinc sulphate also showed best performance in all the above mentioned parameters that was superior over unprimed seed. Among all the genotypes, Tulasi showed better performance in all characters which was statistically superior to Lam minumu and Jaladeeswara. Correlation studies exhibited highly significant positive association of number of pods per plant, number of branches per plant, plant height at maturity and negative association of days to 50 % flowering with seed yield. Micronutrient analysis of soil after harvest indicated that genotype and treatment exhibited significant impact on residual zinc, iron and boron contents. The interaction due to genotype and treatment showed significant effect on residual zinc and boron contents but non-significant influence on residual iron content of soil after harvest. Results revealed that better absorption of nutrients was noticed after seed priming with combination of all the micronutrients viz., 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid in Tulasi. Seed quality parameters of harvested crop exhibited non-significant effect among all the three genotypes in germination and field emergence while significant influence was observed in case of seedling length, seedling vigour index and total protein content. Nutripriming treatments exerted significant influence on germination, seedling length and seedling vigour index while non significant effect on field emergence and total protein content. Genotype, treatment and their interaction showed significant influence on seedling length and seedling vigour index, which were highest upon nutripriming with zinc sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid and 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid in Tulasi, respectively. The present study disclosed that blackgram genotype, Tulasi, showed better performance upon nutripriming. Nutripriming with combination of all the three micronutrients 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.05 % iron sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid and 0.05 % zinc sulphate + 0.1 % boric acid proved to be efficient in enhancing seed yield and quality of blackgram genotypes.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    INFLUENCE OF ACCELERATED AGING AND GA3 PRIMING ON SEED QUALITY OF SORGHUM
    (2021-09-03) YASASHWINI, S.; BAYYAPU REDDY, K
    The present investigation was carried out in the Department of Seed Science and Technology, Advanced Post Graduate Centre, Lam, during 2019-20 to assess the influence of accelerated aging on physiological and biochemical parameters of sorghum seed also to study the effect of priming with gibberellic acid on quality of accelerated aged seed of sorghum, variety NTJ-5 and to predict the storage potential of sorghum seed using accelerated aging test. Initially seed of sorghum variety, NTJ-5 was subjected to accelerated aging for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. The physiological and biochemical parameters of accelerated aged seeds were tested along with control (unaged seed). The accelerated aging caused highly significant decline in all the seed quality parameters viz., germination, seedling length, seedling vigour index, field emergence, total soluble sugars and peroxidase (POX) activity. Moisture content, electrical conductivity (EC) of seed leachates, proline content, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content showed a highly significant increase with increase in the duration of accelerated aging. Maximum per cent decline in germination (39.55%), seedling length (24.79%) seedling vigour index (54.63%), field emergence (37.18%), total soluble sugars (30.06%) and peroxidase (POX) activity (45.02%) over the control was observed with 96 h of accelerated aging. Correlation studies showed a highly significant positive correlation among all the physiological parameters except moisture content and EC of seed leachates which showed highly significant negative association with the remaining characters. Total soluble sugars and POX activity exhibited a significant positive association and proline, H2O2 and MDA content had a significant negative correlation with all the physiological parameters under study except EC of seed leachates. The accelerated aged seed was subjected to hormonal priming with GA3 50 ppm for various durations (3, 6, 9 and 12 h) along with control to standardize the best duration of priming. The seed quality traits were studied by performing standard xvi germination test by between paper method. Among different durations, highest germination (%), seedling length (cm) and seedling vigor index were recorded with 9 hours duration and beyond that the seed quality declined gradually upto 12 hours. Based on standardization results the aged and unaged seed of sorghum was subjected to seed priming with GA3 50 ppm for 9 hours and shade dried to reach safe moisture content. The invigorated aged seed along with untreated aged and unaged seed was used for assessing physiological and biochemical characters. Results revealed that accelerated aging caused a highly significant reduction in all the physiological parameters except EC of seed leachates and showed a highly significant increment in all the biochemical parameters under study except total soluble sugars and POX activity. Hormonal priming with GA3 50 ppm showed a highly significant improvement in seed quality and biochemical parameters. The interaction effect between accelerated aging and hormonal priming with GA3 showed a significant impact on all the physiological and biochemical parameters except germination and field emergence. Correlation studies showed a highly significant positive correlation among all the physiological parameters except EC of seed leachates which exhibited significant negative association with the remaining characters. Total soluble sugars showed a positive association and POX activity had a significant positive correlation with all the physiological parameters except EC of seed leachates. Proline content exhibited a significant negative association whereas H2O2 and MDA contents showed a highly significant negative association with all the physiological parameters under study except EC of seed leachates. The seed samples with different levels of germination and seedling vigour thus obtained by accelerated aging along with the control were kept for storage in cloth bag under ambient conditions. The physiological parameters were tested at monthly interval, while biochemical characters were assessed at bimonthly intervals. The physiological parameters, total soluble sugars and POX activity decreased significantly and the EC of seed leachates, proline, H2O2 and MDA content showed a highly significant increase due to accelerated aging and period of storage. The results indicated that the germination recorded at 24 h of accelerated aging was almost equivalent to normal (unaged) seed stored for 4 months. From the results it can be found that accelerated aged exhibited lesser storability compared to unaged seed. Correlation studies of biochemical characters with germination, seedling quality parameters and EC of seed leachates of accelerated aged seed of sorghum during storage revealed that total soluble sugars and POX activity showed a positive correlation and proline, H2O2 and MDA content exhibited a negative correlation with all the physiological parameters under study except EC of seed leachates. The present study proved that hormonal priming with GA3 50 ppm significantly improved the quality of accelerated aged seed of sorghum. Accelerated aging test can be used to predict the storability of sorghum seed.