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Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur

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The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established on 12th June 1964 at Hyderabad. The University was formally inaugurated on 20th March 1965 by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India. Another significant milestone was the inauguration of the building programme of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi,the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India on 23rd June 1966. The University was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on 7th November 1996 in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga, who rendered remarkable selfless service for the cause of farmers and is regarded as an outstanding educationist, kisan leader and freedom fighter. HISTORICAL MILESTONE Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU) was established under the name of Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) on the 12th of June 1964 through the APAU Act 1963. Later, it was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on the 7th of November, 1996 in honour and memory of the noted Parliamentarian and Kisan Leader, Acharya N. G. Ranga. At the verge of completion of Golden Jubilee Year of the ANGRAU, it has given birth to a new State Agricultural University namely Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University with the bifurcation of the state of Andhra Pradesh as per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014. The ANGRAU at LAM, Guntur is serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication. Genesis of ANGRAU in service of the farmers 1926: The Royal Commission emphasized the need for a strong research base for agricultural development in the country... 1949: The Radhakrishnan Commission (1949) on University Education led to the establishment of Rural Universities for the overall development of agriculture and rural life in the country... 1955: First Joint Indo-American Team studied the status and future needs of agricultural education in the country... 1960: Second Joint Indo-American Team (1960) headed by Dr. M. S. Randhawa, the then Vice-President of Indian Council of Agricultural Research recommended specifically the establishment of Farm Universities and spelt out the basic objectives of these Universities as Institutional Autonomy, inclusion of Agriculture, Veterinary / Animal Husbandry and Home Science, Integration of Teaching, Research and Extension... 1963: The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) Act enacted... June 12th 1964: Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established at Hyderabad with Shri. O. Pulla Reddi, I.C.S. (Retired) was the first founder Vice-Chancellor of the University... June 1964: Re-affilitation of Colleges of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Hyderabad (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Osmania University), Agricultural College, Bapatla (estt. in 1945, affiliated to Andhra University), Sri Venkateswara Agricultural College, Tirupati and Andhra Veterinary College, Tirupati (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Sri Venkateswara University)... 20th March 1965: Formal inauguration of APAU by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... 1964-66: The report of the Second National Education Commission headed by Dr. D.S. Kothari, Chairman of the University Grants Commission stressed the need for establishing at least one Agricultural University in each Indian State... 23, June 1966: Inauguration of the Administrative building of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... July, 1966: Transfer of 41 Agricultural Research Stations, functioning under the Department of Agriculture... May, 1967: Transfer of Four Research Stations of the Animal Husbandry Department... 7th November 1996: Renaming of University as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga... 15th July 2005: Establishment of Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University (SVVU) bifurcating ANGRAU by Act 18 of 2005... 26th June 2007: Establishment of Andhra Pradesh Horticultural University (APHU) bifurcating ANGRAU by the Act 30 of 2007... 2nd June 2014 As per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014, ANGRAU is now... serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication...

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    DETECTION AND MANAGEMENT OF SEED BORNE FUNGI IN SESAME
    (Acharya N.G. Ranga Agricultural University, 2018) LAKSHMI PRAVALLIKA, PALUSANI; SREE LAKSHMI, B
    The present investigation was carried out in the laboratory of Plant Pathology, Regional Agricultural Research Station, Lam and Department of Seed Science and Technology, Advanced Post Graduate Centre, Lam, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh during 2017-2018 to estimate seed borne mycoflora of sesame, their impact on seed quality parameters and management of seed borne fungi in sesame. A total of 28 including 16 farmers‟ saved seed samples of sesame were collected from different farmers‟ and research stations from various sesame growing areas in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana states. The seed samples were analysed for seed borne mycoflora by standard blotter method, deep freezing blotter method, 2, 4-D blotter method, water agar method, agar plate method with PDA and paper towel method. A total of seven fungal species belonging to six genera viz., Alternaria sesami, Curvularia sp., Fusarium sp., Helminthosporium sp., Rhizopus sp., Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were found to be associated with the seed of sesame indicating their seed borne nature. Among these fungi, the mean incidence of Alternaria sesami was highest (31.44%), while that of Helminthosporium sp. was found to be the lowest (4.82%) in all the detection methods. Among the six methods, standard blotter method was found to be superior by recording maximum incidence of mycoflora (31.48%) from all the test samples, while water agar method (9.50%) was found to be least effective for the detection of seed borne fungi. Samples collected from farmers‟ were highly infected with different mycoflora when compared to samples collected from research stations in all the six detection methods. The inhibitory effect of major seed borne fungus, Alternaria sesami was observed on seed germination, seedling length and seedling vigour index of sesame seed samples collected from different sources and locations. Significant differences in seed germination, seedling length and seedling vigour index were observed among the uninoculated as well as inoculated sesame seed samples. The results indicated that xv Alternaria sesami caused 15.13% to 49.68%, 12.77% to 46.14% and 28.28% to 72.87% per cent reduction in seed germination, seedling length and vigour index, respectively of inoculated seed over uninoculated seeds. The per cent reduction was highest in the seed samples of YLM-17 collected from farmers‟ of Prakasam district. A total of eleven fungicides, six botanicals and six bio-control agents were evaluated against Alternaria sesami under in vitro conditions using poisoned food technique and dual culture technique, respectively. Among them, fungicides viz., Combination product of carbendazim 12% + mancozeb 63% @ 0.2% and hexaconazole @ 0.2%; bio-control agents Trichoderma viride (isolate-2) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (isolate-1) and botanicals viz., garlic clove extract 10% and neem leaf extract 10% significantly inhibited the growth of A. sesami under in vitro conditions. A total of seven seed treatments, comprising of two each of fungicides, bio-control agents and botanicals and untreated control, which were identified as the best treatments under in vitro conditions, were imposed for the management of Alternaria blight in sesame in pot culture. The observations on various seed quality parameters were recorded and the results revealed significant differences in germination (%), seedling length (cm) and seedling vigour index-I among different seed treatments as compared to control (untreated seeds). The variation in seedling vigour index-II was non-significant among different seed treatments. Sesame seed treated with combination product of carbendazim 12% + mancozeb 63% @ 0.2% recorded higher seed germination (98.75%), seedling length (16.80 cm), seedling vigour index-I (1659) and seedling vigour index-II (2.94) when compared to other treatments prior to sowing. Evaluation of selected fungicides, botanicals and bio-control agents against Alternaria leaf spot of sesame in pot culture showed that seed treatment with combination product of carbendazim 12% + mancozeb 63% @ 0.2% was effective in reducing the disease intensity (63.20%) of Alternaria leaf spot and also increase in plant height (44.11 cm), number of capsules per plant (12.53), seed yield per plant (2.23 g) and harvest index (14.17) when compared to control (without seed treatment). The observations recorded on various seed quality parameters of harvested seed from pot culture revealed significant differences among different seed treatments. Sesame seed harvested from seed treated with combination product of carbendazim 12% + mancozeb 63% @ 0.2% recorded highest seed germination (99.33%), seedling length (17.37 cm), seedling vigour index-I (1725) and seedling vigour index-II (3.97). Based on the present results it is concluded that seed treatment with combination product of carbendazim 12% + mancozeb 63% @ 0.2% reduces the seed borne infections besides improving yield and quality parameters in sesame.