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Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur

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The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established on 12th June 1964 at Hyderabad. The University was formally inaugurated on 20th March 1965 by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India. Another significant milestone was the inauguration of the building programme of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi,the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India on 23rd June 1966. The University was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on 7th November 1996 in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga, who rendered remarkable selfless service for the cause of farmers and is regarded as an outstanding educationist, kisan leader and freedom fighter. HISTORICAL MILESTONE Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU) was established under the name of Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) on the 12th of June 1964 through the APAU Act 1963. Later, it was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on the 7th of November, 1996 in honour and memory of the noted Parliamentarian and Kisan Leader, Acharya N. G. Ranga. At the verge of completion of Golden Jubilee Year of the ANGRAU, it has given birth to a new State Agricultural University namely Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University with the bifurcation of the state of Andhra Pradesh as per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014. The ANGRAU at LAM, Guntur is serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication. Genesis of ANGRAU in service of the farmers 1926: The Royal Commission emphasized the need for a strong research base for agricultural development in the country... 1949: The Radhakrishnan Commission (1949) on University Education led to the establishment of Rural Universities for the overall development of agriculture and rural life in the country... 1955: First Joint Indo-American Team studied the status and future needs of agricultural education in the country... 1960: Second Joint Indo-American Team (1960) headed by Dr. M. S. Randhawa, the then Vice-President of Indian Council of Agricultural Research recommended specifically the establishment of Farm Universities and spelt out the basic objectives of these Universities as Institutional Autonomy, inclusion of Agriculture, Veterinary / Animal Husbandry and Home Science, Integration of Teaching, Research and Extension... 1963: The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) Act enacted... June 12th 1964: Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established at Hyderabad with Shri. O. Pulla Reddi, I.C.S. (Retired) was the first founder Vice-Chancellor of the University... June 1964: Re-affilitation of Colleges of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Hyderabad (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Osmania University), Agricultural College, Bapatla (estt. in 1945, affiliated to Andhra University), Sri Venkateswara Agricultural College, Tirupati and Andhra Veterinary College, Tirupati (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Sri Venkateswara University)... 20th March 1965: Formal inauguration of APAU by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... 1964-66: The report of the Second National Education Commission headed by Dr. D.S. Kothari, Chairman of the University Grants Commission stressed the need for establishing at least one Agricultural University in each Indian State... 23, June 1966: Inauguration of the Administrative building of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... July, 1966: Transfer of 41 Agricultural Research Stations, functioning under the Department of Agriculture... May, 1967: Transfer of Four Research Stations of the Animal Husbandry Department... 7th November 1996: Renaming of University as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga... 15th July 2005: Establishment of Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University (SVVU) bifurcating ANGRAU by Act 18 of 2005... 26th June 2007: Establishment of Andhra Pradesh Horticultural University (APHU) bifurcating ANGRAU by the Act 30 of 2007... 2nd June 2014 As per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014, ANGRAU is now... serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication...

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    GENOTYPIC VARIATION FOR BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERS AND SEED QUALITY PARAMETERS UNDER DROUGHT STRESS CONDITIONS IN CHICKPEA
    (Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur, 2019) HIMAJA, RAVILLA; RADHIKA, K
    The present investigation was carried out in the Department of Seed Science and Technology, Advanced Post Graduate Centre, Lam, Guntur during 2018-19 to study the genotypic variation among the chickpea genotypes for biochemical and seed quality parameters under drought stress conditions. Biochemical characters such as nitrogen content, protein, proline, soluble sugars and MDA content along with activity of peroxidase, esterase and acid phosphatase were estimated in the seed of thirty three chickpea genotypes. Significant variation in biochemical composition was noticed among the genotypes. Correlation studies revealed highly significant positive association among all the biochemical characters except MDA content which exhibited highly significant negative association with the remaining characters. Acid phosphatase exhibited positive correlation with the biochemical characters under study Seed of thirty three different chickpea genotypes were subjected to various levels (-0.3, -0.6, -0.9, -1.2 MPa) of PEG induced drought stress and tested for germination and seedling growth along with control and hydration treatments. Differential influence of PEG 6000 induced drought stress was noticed among the genotypes. With the increase in drought stress, germination, root length, shoot length, seedling length and seedling vigour index decreased gradually. In most of the genotypes complete inhibition of germination was observed at -1.2 MPa. JG 11 followed by NBeG 3 exhibited comparatively higher germination and seedling quality parameters even at higher levels of drought indicating their tolerance towards drought, while NBeG 723 and NBeG 833 did not perform better even under lower levels of drought stress. The biochemical composition and enzymatic activities of JG 11 and NBeG 3 was found to be significantly superior to that of all the remaining chickpea genotypes under study, while reverse was noticed with NBeG 723 and NBeG 833. xv Based on the data on biochemical composition of seed and seed quality parameters, two genotypes with tolerance (JG 11 and NBeG 3), three genotypes with moderate response (KAK 2, NBeG 868 and NBeG 801) and two genotypes susceptible (NBEG 723 and NBeG 833) to drought stress were selected to further study the trend of variation among the genotypes for germination and seedling quality parameters under water deficit and also the contribution of biochemical characters and enzymatic activities in the seedlings in imparting drought stress Germination, seedling growth and vigour declined significantly and progressively with increase in the level of drought stress in all the seven genotypes. However, the negative impact of drought stress was found to be more pronounced in the sensitive genotypes than the tolerant genotypes. Increased levels of drought stress showed gradual reduction in all the biochemical characters studied except for MDA content. Among the seven chickpea genotypes under study, comparatively lower reduction in nitrogen, protein, proline, soluble sugars, peroxidase, acid phosphatase and esterase activity along with a slight increase in MDA content was observed in JG 11 and NBeG 3. NBeG 723 and NBeG 833 exhibited higher levels of MDA content and greater reduction in all the remaining biochemical parameters studied indicating their susceptibility towards PEG induced drought stress. Correlation studies revealed highly significant positive association of protein, proline, soluble sugars and peroxidases with germination and seedling quality parameters, while highly significant negative correlation of MDA content was noticed with seed quality. Based on the results obtained from the above studies, the chickpea genotypes JG 11 and NBeG 3 were considered as tolerant and NBeG 723 and NBeG 833 were categorized as susceptible to PEG induced drought stress during germination and early seedling growth. These genotypes need to be further tested for their reaction to drought stress in the field. Biochemical characterization for protein, proline, soluble sugars, MDA contents and peroxidase activity can be considered as a suitable assay for screening of chickpea genotypes for drought stress.