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Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur

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The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established on 12th June 1964 at Hyderabad. The University was formally inaugurated on 20th March 1965 by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India. Another significant milestone was the inauguration of the building programme of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi,the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India on 23rd June 1966. The University was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on 7th November 1996 in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga, who rendered remarkable selfless service for the cause of farmers and is regarded as an outstanding educationist, kisan leader and freedom fighter. HISTORICAL MILESTONE Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU) was established under the name of Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) on the 12th of June 1964 through the APAU Act 1963. Later, it was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on the 7th of November, 1996 in honour and memory of the noted Parliamentarian and Kisan Leader, Acharya N. G. Ranga. At the verge of completion of Golden Jubilee Year of the ANGRAU, it has given birth to a new State Agricultural University namely Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University with the bifurcation of the state of Andhra Pradesh as per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014. The ANGRAU at LAM, Guntur is serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication. Genesis of ANGRAU in service of the farmers 1926: The Royal Commission emphasized the need for a strong research base for agricultural development in the country... 1949: The Radhakrishnan Commission (1949) on University Education led to the establishment of Rural Universities for the overall development of agriculture and rural life in the country... 1955: First Joint Indo-American Team studied the status and future needs of agricultural education in the country... 1960: Second Joint Indo-American Team (1960) headed by Dr. M. S. Randhawa, the then Vice-President of Indian Council of Agricultural Research recommended specifically the establishment of Farm Universities and spelt out the basic objectives of these Universities as Institutional Autonomy, inclusion of Agriculture, Veterinary / Animal Husbandry and Home Science, Integration of Teaching, Research and Extension... 1963: The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) Act enacted... June 12th 1964: Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established at Hyderabad with Shri. O. Pulla Reddi, I.C.S. (Retired) was the first founder Vice-Chancellor of the University... June 1964: Re-affilitation of Colleges of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Hyderabad (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Osmania University), Agricultural College, Bapatla (estt. in 1945, affiliated to Andhra University), Sri Venkateswara Agricultural College, Tirupati and Andhra Veterinary College, Tirupati (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Sri Venkateswara University)... 20th March 1965: Formal inauguration of APAU by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... 1964-66: The report of the Second National Education Commission headed by Dr. D.S. Kothari, Chairman of the University Grants Commission stressed the need for establishing at least one Agricultural University in each Indian State... 23, June 1966: Inauguration of the Administrative building of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... July, 1966: Transfer of 41 Agricultural Research Stations, functioning under the Department of Agriculture... May, 1967: Transfer of Four Research Stations of the Animal Husbandry Department... 7th November 1996: Renaming of University as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga... 15th July 2005: Establishment of Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University (SVVU) bifurcating ANGRAU by Act 18 of 2005... 26th June 2007: Establishment of Andhra Pradesh Horticultural University (APHU) bifurcating ANGRAU by the Act 30 of 2007... 2nd June 2014 As per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014, ANGRAU is now... serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication...

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    CLUSTERING OF RICE GENOTYPES -A MULTIVARIATE APPROACH
    (Acharya N.G. Ranga Agricultural University, 2018) DEVADASU CHINNI; NAFEEZ UMAR, SK
    Secondary data on 17 yield and yield contributing characters was collected from Agricultural Research Station (ARS), Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, at which experiment was carried out on 60 rice genotypes, during early kharif, 2016 to evaluate, categorize and classify them and for computation of Principal Components to determine the relative importance of Principal Components and characters involved in them. Studies based on genetic divergence utilizing D2 analysis revealed that, the genotypes were grouped into 8 clusters of which clusters II was the largest cluster consisting of 21 genotypes while cluster III, IV, VII and VIII are the smallest clusters with only single genotype in each of them. The maximum intra cluster distance was found in cluster VI (D = 371.74) consisting of 8 genotypes. From the inter cluster D2 values of eight clusters, it can be seen that the highest divergence occurred between cluster V and cluster VI (1651.37) While the minimum inter cluster distance was noticed between cluster IV and cluster VII (94.06). It is observed that cluster III as well as cluster VIII had recorded highest means values for most of the characters. Out of 17 characters studied the maximum contribution (79.66 %) towards total divergence is by 5 characters only viz., days to maturity, test weight, flag leaf width, flag leaf length, days to 50% flowering. To know the relative importance and usefulness of variables and genotypes, principal component analysis was done which explained 76% variability through first six principal components. Data were further analyzed using principal factor analysis to offset the limitation of principal component analysis. All the variables exhibited high loading on different factors. Principal factor scores were obtained to know the performance of different genotypes in different factors that ascribed to a particular set of characters. Thus, the genotypes JGL 11118, WHITE PONNI, NLR 33671, NLR 33057 and TN 1 were having high principal factor score in PF I. Similarly, genotypes IR 109A235, IR 64, MTU1010, BG63672, NLR3217, NLR33359 and IR10C172 having high scores in PF II. Likewise, genotypes NLR 3042, NLR 40065, NLR 3296, ADT 37, NLR3350, NLR3407 and NLR30491 in PF III; NLR 3241, JGL 1798, NLR 40058, NLR40024 in PF IV; IR 11C208, IR 11C208, MDT 10, IR 11C228, ADT 43, IR64197, IR11C219 in PF V and IR 64197, IR11C186 in PF VI were found to be having high principal factor scores.