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Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur

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The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established on 12th June 1964 at Hyderabad. The University was formally inaugurated on 20th March 1965 by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India. Another significant milestone was the inauguration of the building programme of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi,the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India on 23rd June 1966. The University was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on 7th November 1996 in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga, who rendered remarkable selfless service for the cause of farmers and is regarded as an outstanding educationist, kisan leader and freedom fighter. HISTORICAL MILESTONE Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU) was established under the name of Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) on the 12th of June 1964 through the APAU Act 1963. Later, it was renamed as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University on the 7th of November, 1996 in honour and memory of the noted Parliamentarian and Kisan Leader, Acharya N. G. Ranga. At the verge of completion of Golden Jubilee Year of the ANGRAU, it has given birth to a new State Agricultural University namely Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University with the bifurcation of the state of Andhra Pradesh as per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014. The ANGRAU at LAM, Guntur is serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication. Genesis of ANGRAU in service of the farmers 1926: The Royal Commission emphasized the need for a strong research base for agricultural development in the country... 1949: The Radhakrishnan Commission (1949) on University Education led to the establishment of Rural Universities for the overall development of agriculture and rural life in the country... 1955: First Joint Indo-American Team studied the status and future needs of agricultural education in the country... 1960: Second Joint Indo-American Team (1960) headed by Dr. M. S. Randhawa, the then Vice-President of Indian Council of Agricultural Research recommended specifically the establishment of Farm Universities and spelt out the basic objectives of these Universities as Institutional Autonomy, inclusion of Agriculture, Veterinary / Animal Husbandry and Home Science, Integration of Teaching, Research and Extension... 1963: The Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) Act enacted... June 12th 1964: Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University (APAU) was established at Hyderabad with Shri. O. Pulla Reddi, I.C.S. (Retired) was the first founder Vice-Chancellor of the University... June 1964: Re-affilitation of Colleges of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Hyderabad (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Osmania University), Agricultural College, Bapatla (estt. in 1945, affiliated to Andhra University), Sri Venkateswara Agricultural College, Tirupati and Andhra Veterinary College, Tirupati (estt. in 1961, affiliated to Sri Venkateswara University)... 20th March 1965: Formal inauguration of APAU by Late Shri. Lal Bahadur Shastri, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... 1964-66: The report of the Second National Education Commission headed by Dr. D.S. Kothari, Chairman of the University Grants Commission stressed the need for establishing at least one Agricultural University in each Indian State... 23, June 1966: Inauguration of the Administrative building of the university by Late Smt. Indira Gandhi, the then Hon`ble Prime Minister of India... July, 1966: Transfer of 41 Agricultural Research Stations, functioning under the Department of Agriculture... May, 1967: Transfer of Four Research Stations of the Animal Husbandry Department... 7th November 1996: Renaming of University as Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University in honour and memory of an outstanding parliamentarian Acharya Nayukulu Gogineni Ranga... 15th July 2005: Establishment of Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University (SVVU) bifurcating ANGRAU by Act 18 of 2005... 26th June 2007: Establishment of Andhra Pradesh Horticultural University (APHU) bifurcating ANGRAU by the Act 30 of 2007... 2nd June 2014 As per the Andhra Pradesh Reorganization Act 2014, ANGRAU is now... serving the students and the farmers of 13 districts of new State of Andhra Pradesh with renewed interest and dedication...

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    FOREWARNING MODELS FOR PESTS AND DISEASES OF GROUNDNUT
    (Acharya N.G. Ranga Agricultural University, 2017) AMARNADH, V; RAVINDRA REDDY, B
    The present study “Forewarning models for pests and diseases of groundnut” was mainly aimed at to study the behaviour of climate factors on major pests and diseases of groundnut, to establish association between climatic factors and pests and diseases of various groundnut varieties in different years in groundnut growing seasons, to generate forewarning statistical models for prediction of major pests and diseases based on climatic factors and also to study the influence of pests and diseases on various groundnut varieties with respect to climate factors. The selection of location (Regional Agricultural Research Station (RARS), Tirupati) for data collection was done on the basis of major groundnut grown area and also compatibility. The secondary data on major pests (%) and disease (%) incidence of various groundnut varieties along with climate factors were collected for the period from 2007 to 2016 (10 years) during crop seasons. The correlation studies were under taken to study the relationship between various pests and disease incidence subject to the climate factors. The Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) models were used for predication of groundnut pest and disease incidence. The logistic models were also used for prediction of the probabilities of occurrence /non-occurrence of pests and disease of groundnut in standard weeks of groundnut growing seasons. The descriptive statistics were used to know the behaviour of climate factors along with pests and disease incidence over years during the crop seasons. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) techniques applied to test the significance between standard weeks/varieties/years with respect to pest and diseases of groundnut. Finally, markov chain models were used to identifying the presence/absence of pest in consequent days effectively. xvii The results revealed that climatic factors from 2007 to 2016 in groundnut growing seasons the rainfall distribution varied greatly within groundnut growing seasons over years (13.61 mm – 36.06 mm). The average minimum temperatures (21.52°C – 22.03°C), maximum temperatures 31.80°C – 34.75°C), morning relative humidity (73.11 - 83.58%) and evening relative humidity (43.81 - 58.36%) were observed. The results revealed that the days with RH > 78 per cent, temperature (13°C - 42°C) and weekly rainfall are most critical factors in the development of leafhopper incidence, the days with RH > 78 per cent, temperature (15°C - 42°C) are the most critical factors in the development of groundnut leaf miner incidence, the days with RH > 77 per cent, temperature (19°C - 37°C) are the most critical factors in the development of thrips incidence and the days with RH > 77 per cent, temperature (15°C - 43°C) are the most critical factors in the development of root grub incidence. The days with RH > 81 per cent, temperature (16°C - 35°C) and weekly rainfall are the most critical factors in the development of late leaf spot incidence and the days with RH > 82 per cent, temperature (21.2°C - 35°C) and weekly rainfall are the most critical factors in the development of rust incidence. Correlation coefficients were computed to ascertain the pattern of relationship between major pests/diseases and climate factors over years (2007-2016) and within year (groundnut growing seasons) under different groundnut varieties. Overall for the years 2007 to 2016 the results of correlation studies revealed that, there was a positive relationship between the leafhopper incidence and climate factors viz., rainfall, evening relative humidity and sunshine hours. There exist positive relationship between the groundnut leaf miner incidence and maximum temperature, minimum temperature, rainfall and evening relative humidity and negative relationship with morning relative humidity and sunshine hours. For thrips there exist positive relationship with temperatures and wind velocity and negative relationship with morning relative humidity, evening relative humidity, rainfall and sunshine hours. In case of root grub there exist positive relationship with temperatures, rainfall, evening relative humidity, wind velocity and negative relationship with morning relative humidity and sunshine hours. The results on late leaf spot revealed that the positive relationship with temperatures, sunshine hours and the negative relationship with morning relative humidity, evening relative humidity and wind velocity. For rust, among the climate factors evening relative humidity, wind velocity and rainfall exhibited negative association and rest of the climate factors were positively associated. xviii The results of ANOVA for major pests/diseases established that there was significant variation between the varieties, between the standard weeks and over years. The MLR models for within year and between years found to be useful in the prediction of various pests and diseases incidence. The logistic models were found to be useful in the prediction of probabilities for occurrence and non-occurrence of various pests and disease incidence of groundnut. The markov chain models revealed that there was significant change occurring of various pests except root grub in consecutive days for the latest period (2012-16). Further, with the help these models one can predict that the occurring of various pests/diseases of groundnut over the period of time.