Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat

Assam Agricultural University is the first institution of its kind in the whole of North-Eastern Region of India. The main goal of this institution is to produce globally competitive human resources in farm sectorand to carry out research in both conventional and frontier areas for production optimization as well as to disseminate the generated technologies as public good for benefitting the food growers/produces and traders involved in the sector while emphasizing on sustainability, equity and overall food security at household level. Genesis of AAU - The embryo of the agricultural research in the state of Assam was formed as early as 1897 with the establishment of the Upper Shillong Experimental Farm (now in Meghalaya) just after about a decade of creation of the agricultural department in 1882. However, the seeds of agricultural research in today’s Assam were sown in the dawn of the twentieth century with the establishment of two Rice Experimental Stations, one at Karimganj in Barak valley in 1913 and the other at Titabor in Brahmaputra valley in 1923. Subsequent to these research stations, a number of research stations were established to conduct research on important crops, more specifically, jute, pulses, oilseeds etc. The Assam Agricultural University was established on April 1, 1969 under The Assam Agricultural University Act, 1968’ with the mandate of imparting farm education, conduct research in agriculture and allied sciences and to effectively disseminate technologies so generated. Before establishment of the University, there were altogether 17 research schemes/projects in the state under the Department of Agriculture. By July 1973, all the research projects and 10 experimental farms were transferred by the Government of Assam to the AAU which already inherited the College of Agriculture and its farm at Barbheta, Jorhat and College of Veterinary Sciences at Khanapara, Guwahati. Subsequently, College of Community Science at Jorhat (1969), College of Fisheries at Raha (1988), Biswanath College of Agriculture at Biswanath Chariali (1988) and Lakhimpur College of Veterinary Science at Joyhing, North Lakhimpur (1988) were established. Presently, the University has three more colleges under its jurisdiction, viz., Sarat Chandra Singha College of Agriculture, Chapar, College of Horticulture, Nalbari & College of Sericulture, Titabar. Similarly, few more regional research stations at Shillongani, Diphu, Gossaigaon, Lakhimpur; and commodity research stations at Kahikuchi, Buralikson, Tinsukia, Kharua, Burnihat and Mandira were added to generate location and crop specific agricultural production packages.

Browse

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 9 of 1037
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Workspace Environment of the Computer operating Employees in Banking Sector- An Analysis
    (2021) Gogoi, Animesh; Bhuyan, Bijoylaxmi
    The banking sector is a part of a nation’s economy as banks play vital role in implementing and planning of the financial policy. All the transaction of money and financial issues come under the banking sector. So it is very important that the employees have very good mental and physical status to deliver their responsibilities to the utmost perfection. A good work space environment can lead to high productivity where as a poor workspace environment can cause problems to the workers and the organization. Comfortable and ergonomic office design motivates the employees and increases their performance substantially (Deshpande, 2013). Furthermore, work stress can affect workers in many ways; from lowering resistance to illnesses and depriving them of sleep, to interfering with their concentration as a result more injuries and accidents occur (Adeyemi 2013). This study was aimed to investigate musculoskeletal disorders and onset of stress and its relationship due to the effect of workstation factors like illumination, temperature, humidity, noise, office furniture and colour of walls on computer operating employees of banking sector of Jorhat town. Data was collected through the use of questionnaire and observation methods from 129 bank employees and was analysed through statistical methods. About 40.3% employees 28.63% Male and 11.62% Female) were found to suffer from different musculoskeletal problems. The study found a significant relation with some workstation environment factors and musculoskeletal disorders. Apart from this, some workstation environment factors were also found to have significant relationship with stress outcome of the employees. The study suggested that people must understand their workspace environment factors and should design it in terms of their body requirements and adhere to recommended ergonomic specifications in a proper way for better performance and productivity maintaining good health and wellness.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Variation of Weed Suppressing Ability (WSA) of popular Ahu rice varieties
    (2021) Brahma, Thirangtha; Sharma, Kishore K.
    The research was carried out with ten Ahu genotypes (including two joha mutants). The objective of the study was to identify Ahu rice varieties with weed suppressing ability (WSA), determine genetic variability and determination of the component traits for weed suppressing ability. High PCV was observed for all the characters except field emergence, plant biomass at maturity, plant height at 20 DAS and 40 DAS, grains per panicle and 1000 grain weight. High GCV were observed for number of leaves at 60 DAS and maturity, leaf area, leaf angle, plant height at 60 DAS and maturity, plant biomass at 60 DAS, total plants/m2, total tillers/m2, ear bearing tillers and grain yield /m2. High heritability was observed for all the characters except number of leaves at 20 DAS. High genetic advance was observed for all the traits except panicle length and 1000 grain weight. Estimation of correlation coefficient revealed very strong positive association of grain yield with plant biomass at maturity, plant height at maturity, total plants/m2, total tillers/m2, ear bearing tillers, grains per panicle, 1000 gr. Wt. and weed suppressing ability. Moderately strong association was found with number of leaf at maturity. Negative association was observed with weed biomass at maturity, number of weeds, leaf angle and days to flowering. Strong positive association of weed suppressing ability was found with number of leaves at maturity, plant biomass at maturity, plant height at maturity, total plants/m2, ear bearing tillers and grains per panicle. Moderately strong association was found with leaf area and 1000- grain weight. Negative association was found with weed biomass, number of weeds, days to flowering and panicle length. Characters positively associated with weed suppressing ability: number of leaves at maturity, plant biomass at maturity, plant height at maturity, total plants/m2, ear bearing tillers/m2, grains per panicle, leaf area and 1000 grain weight. Characters with high heritability having positive correlation with weed suppressing ability are number of leaves, leaf area, plant biomass, plant height and total plants/ m2. From the research, it was concluded that the variety Inglongkiri exhibited the highest weed suppressing ability followed by Banglami, Meghi and Puthia.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Utilization of institutional microfinance by beneficiaries – A study in Sivasagar district of Assam
    (2021) Gogoi, Parthapratim; Sharma, Babita
    Microfinance is an approach of economic development that involves providing financial services, through institutions, to low-income people, where the market fails to provide appropriate services. In present scenario this is found to be an effective instrument for lifting the poor above the level of poverty by providing them self- employment opportunities and making them credit worthy. In India Micro finance programme was formally initiated by National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) in 1992, Like India, in Assam also during past years, (since 2001) the sector has witnessed a sharp growth with the emergence of a number of Micro Finance Institutions (MFIs) that are providing financial and non-financial support to the poor in an effort to lift them out of poverty. But many times it has been seen that beneficiaries are not utilizing micro finance loan for income generation, rather they utilize in non productive work. Sometimes beneficiaries do not have control in utilizing loan, in such case whether beneficiaries could managed repayment? Whether beneficiaries are actually benefited? Whether services of MFI's are satisfactory? Considering these points the present research has been conducted with the objectives: 1. To study socio economic profile of beneficiaries. 2. To study quantum of loan availed, their utilization and repayment by the beneficiaries. 3. To access level of satisfaction of beneficiaries towards micro finance services of MFI’s. One hundred and twenty numbers of total beneficiaries have been selected from Sivsagar district of Assam by adopting multi stage samplings techniques. Findings of the data depicts that beneficiaries in the study area came to know about institutional micro finance mostly from MFI representatives working in their area and other sources like advertisement in TV/Radio/Newspapers, Posters, Hoardings etc. Beneficiaries association with multiple MFI's found among highest percentage of beneficiaries in study area. Only 30.0 percent of the beneficiaries utilized the loan amount by themselves. Utilization of micro finance loan by husband and other family member along with beneficiaries found among majority of beneficiaries household. Moreover loan utilization was found mostly in traditional activities like livestock, petty business, agriculture etc. Study also revealed that diversifications of loan amount to unproductive purpose are common in study area. Regarding repayment of loan it was found that 62.6 percent of the beneficiaries were found as defaulter due to various reasons and more prominent reasons are improper use of loan and insufficient income. From KMO and Bartlett's Test, it is found that some factor had positive influenced on repayment of institutional micro finance loan, example: microfinance loan helps in rejuvenate and expansion of old petty business , MFI improved overall socio economic status of a family etc. whereas some factor had negatively influenced on repayment status of institutional micro finance loan like: diversified micro finance loan for unproductive purpose, frequency of loan repayment is not comfortable etc. Beneficiaries perception towards institutional microfinance programme revealed that micro finance program is helping more in personal development than economic and social development. Overall satisfaction level was found medium among beneficiaries in study area. From the study it can be concluded that though emergence of microfinance service is for economic empowerment of women by involving themselves in some income generating activity but in study area most of the loan are utilized by other members of the family. As a result their involvement in economic activity was very poor but burden of repayment lies on them. Default of loan repayment is mainly associated with diversification of loan for unproductive purpose. Moreover, during the study period Covid-19 pandemic has badly affected many beneficiaries income generating activities, as a result many people became defaulter of loan during this period. Lastly, for revival of rural economy and empowerment of the rural poor specially women, recipient also needs to understand purpose of microfinance and utilize loan in a more productive way so that the magnitude of return will be more than existing condition.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND RELEASE OF NANO-ENABLED PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZER IN ACID SOILS OF ASSAM
    (2021) Pachani, Sukanya; Kandali, Gayatri Goswami
    The study on “Synthesis, characterization and release of nano-enabled phosphorus fertilizer in acid soils of Assam” was undertaken during 2019-21with the aim to synthesize and characterize zeolite based nano P fertilizer and to study its release pattern over 90 days of incubation in three different types of soil representing major soil orders of Assam, taking recommended fertilizer dose applicable for maize. Surfactant modification of the zeolite (SMZ) was done by using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMABr) as surfactant and subsequently, the slow-release fertilizer (SRF) for phosphorus was synthesized by treating the SMZ with potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate to prepare the P-loaded SRF. It was observed from the XRD pattern that the zeolite framework had not undergone major structural change by the addition of HDTMABr and the crystallinity of zeolite remained the same. The surface morphology characterized by SEM, showed that the zeolite was of cubical geometry. The developed zeolite based nano P fertilizer recorded an average particle size of < 100 nm. The specific surface area of nano zeolite fertilizer (modified) was found to be less (90.07 m2/g) as compared to unmodified zeolite (262.72 m2/g). The pore diameter was found to be in the microporous (< 20 nm) range. Maximum adsorption of 7.4% added P was found in nanofertilizer which was 60% higher as compared to unmodified zeolite. The incubation study of P release in different treatments over the different types of soil witnessed marked variations during the entire days of incubation. Although no definite trend was observed in absolute control all throughout the incubation period, the lowest concentration of P was found in 7 days of incubation in all the treatments. In treatment receiving recommended dose of P through SSP, there was a gradual rise in available P concentration, reaching the maximum peak at 32 days of incubation beyond which no further increasing trend was observed. Relatively, the treatment receiving recommended dose of P through nano-fertilizer had a gradual increase of P from 7 days upto 90 days of incubation. A similar trend was also observed in nano treated P fertilizer receiving 2.5 times reduction, 5 times reduction, and 10 times reduction from the recommended dose. However, the concentration of release was lower and found to be in decreasing order as compared to recommended P level applied through nano P. Highest concentration of P at 90 days of incubation was found in recommended P applied through nano-fertilizer in the silty clay loam soil (8.82 mg/kg), which was significantly higher than recommended P applied through SSP (7.54 mg/kg). A significant difference was also noticed between recommended dose of phosphorus applied through nano P (8.82 mg/kg) and treatment receiving 2.5 times reduction of recommended P from nano P (6.38 mg/kg). The same trend of P release was observed in the soil with clay loam and sandy clay loam texture. The differences in clay content between the soils affected the P release pattern which followed the order - Majuli (sandy clay loam) > Jorhat (silty clay loam) > Titabar (clay loam).The first-order kinetic constant was found to increase from 0.096 μg/g/day in recommended dose of P applied through SSP to 0.100 μg/g/day in treatment having a 10 times reduction of recommended P given through nano P in the silty clay loam soil. In the case of second-order kinetics, there was a decrease in rate constant value (-0.015 to - 0.014 g/μg/day) which means an increase in the release of P. The rate constant of parabolic diffusion equation was the highest in treatment receiving recommended dose of P through nano-fertilizer (3.012 μg/g/day) in the silty clay loam soil. This increase in rate constant was found in the clay loam and sandy clay loam soil also which indicated high reactivity of the fertilizer. As observed from the R2 value, the parabolic diffusion equation was found to be the best fit for describing the P release as compared to the other two kinetic models.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    PERFORMANCE OF NEW BANANA (Musa spp.) CULTIVARS
    (2021) Gogoi, Sunny; Borthakur, P. K.
    The study on ‘Performance of new banana (Musa spp.) cultivars’ was conducted in the Experimental Farm, Department of Horticulture in Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat during 2019-2020. The experiment was laid out in Randomized Block Design (RBD) with five (5) treatments and four (4) replications. The treatments taken under the study comprised of five banana cultivars namely ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’, ‘Manjeri Nendran-II’, ‘Nendran’, ‘NRCB Selection-10’ and ‘Simalu Manohar’. Experimental results revealed that the morphological characters showed significant differences among the cultivars. In regards to pseudostem height at shooting stage, highest height was recorded in ‘Simalu Manohar’ (312.70 cm) while the lowest was recorded in ‘NRCB Selection-10’ (203.91 cm). The highest pseudostem girth at shooting stage was recorded in ‘Simalu Manohar’ (77.58 cm). In respect to phyllochron, the longest days for successive leaf emergence was recorded in ‘Simalu Manohar’ (11.41 days) and the shortest was recorded in ‘Manjeri Nendran- II’ (8.60 days). The highest leaf area (1.17 m2) was recorded in ‘Simalu Manohar’ whereas the lowest in ‘Nendran’ (1.05 m2). ‘NRCB Selection-10’ recorded the highest number of leaves per plant at shooting (12.70) and the highest number of functional leaves at shooting (10.47). However ‘Simalu Manohar’ recorded the highest number of total leaves (24.53) and ‘Manjeri Nendran-II’ recorded the lowest (21.08). For shooting the shortest time was taken by ‘Manjeri Nendran- II’ (263.41 days) while ‘Simalu Manohar’ took the longest time (314.37 days). The shortest shooting-harvesting duration was recorded in ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ (59.75 days) while the longest was recorded in ‘Simalu Manohar’ (150.18 days). The shortest crop duration (350.35 days) was recorded in ‘Manjeri Nendran-II’ while the longest was recorded in ‘Simalu Manohar’ (464.56 days). Significant variation was noted among the varieties with respect to yield and yield attributing characters. The highest bunch weight was recorded in ‘NRCB Selection-10’ (12.73 kg) followed by ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ (12.39 kg) while the lowest was recorded in ‘Nendran’ (7.03 kg). The highest fruit yield was found in ‘NRCB Selection-10’ (39.31 t/ha) followed by ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ (38.25 t/ha) while the lowest fruit yield was recorded in ‘Nendran’ (21.70 t/ha). The highest number of hands per bunch (8.09) and fingers per hand (13.62) was recorded in ‘NRCB Selection-10’. ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ recorded the highest weight of second hand (2.29 kg) and finger weight (324.70 g). ‘Manjeri Nendran-II’ recorded the longest fingers (21.78 cm) and the lowest (12.85 cm) by ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’. In regards to finger girth and finger diameter the highest value of 20.67 cm and 6.91 cm was recorded in ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’. ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ recorded the highest pulp weight (289.42 g) and pulp-peel ratio (8.22) whereas the highest peel weight was recorded by ‘Simalu Manohar’ (106.22 g). In regards to post harvest study and biochemical constituents significant variation was seen among the varieties. ‘Nendran’ recorded the highest value of TSS (28.92 0B) followed by ‘NRCB Selection-10’ (28.67 0B) while the lowest was recorded by ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ (19.00 0B). The highest titrable acidity (0.49 %) and shelf life (6.50 days) was recorded by ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ whereas the lowest titrable acidity (0.26 %) was recorded by ‘Nendran’ and the lowest shelf life (4.12 days) by ‘NRCB Selection-10’. The highest reducing sugar (16.07 %) and total sugar (19.22 %) was recorded in ‘Manjeri Nendran-II’. ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ recorded the highest value (4.81 %) of non-reducing sugar. The highest value of crude fibre content (2.28 %) was recorded in ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ and the lowest in ‘Nendran’ (1.09 %). Ascorbic acid was recorded highest in ‘Nendran’ (5.15 mg/100g FW) and the lowest in ‘Simalu Manohar’ (3.12 mg/100 g FW). Evaluation of comparative economics of cultivation revealed that the highest benefit cost ratio of 2.03 was obtained in ‘NRCB Selection-10’ followed by ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ (1.94) and the lowest benefit cost ratio of 0.67 was recorded in ‘Nendran’. Hence, among all the cultivars ‘NRCB Selection-10’ and ‘BRS Selection Popoulu’ were found to be the most profitable and suitable cultivars for cultivation.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    STUDY ON NUTRITIONAL AND ANTIOXIDANTS PROFILE OF SOME SPECIALTY RICE CULTIVARS OF ODISHA
    (2021) Bal, Rajesh; Kandali, Ranjan
    Odisha has been considered as the center of genetic diversity for cultivated rice and is endowed with numerous cultivars of specialty rice which have great market potentiality. These traditionally cultivated cultivars were rich in nutritional and healthpromoting components. However, these cultivars were on the verge of disappearing because farmers were shifting to high-yielding types, which had great market potential and provide them with financial security. There is dearth of information on the nutritional aspect of these traditional unexplored rice cultivars. The present investigation entitled 'Study on the nutritional and antioxidant profiles of several specialty rice cultivars from Odisha' was carried out in the laboratory of Department of Biochemistry & Agricultural Chemistry, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat. The objective of this study was to assess the nutritional value and antioxidant activity of these specialty rice cultivars from Odisha. A total of eleven cultivars was used in the study, out of which eight were aromatic (Rajendra Bhagabati, Nua-Dhusara, Kalajeera, Nua-Kalajeera, Nua-Chinikamini, Lall Basana, Nua- Purnabhog and, Nilabati) two were pigmented rice (black rice Kalabati and red rice Jaghabalia), and one as a check variety (Kalachampa). The moisture content, reducing sugar, total soluble sugar, starch, total carbohydrate, crude protein, soluble protein, crude fat, crude fibre, ash, total phenolics, total anthocyanin, and total antioxidant activity of the cultivars were determined. The cultivars were collected from the farmer‟s field at different places of Odisha as well as from National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha. The results showed that the moisture content of all the cultivars were lower than the check variety Kalachampa which recorded 11.914± 0.08 % on a fresh weight basis. The highest per cent starch content was recorded in Nua-Kalajeera (82.791± 0.96) followed by Kalajeera (80.605± 1.173) and Kalabati (79.896± 0.176) while lowest in Nua-Purnabhog (59.612± 0.328). Cultivars varied significantly with respect to starch content (CD0.05=3.407). The highest starch content was observed in aromatic rice cultivar Nua-Kalajeera (82.7g% DW) followed by Kalajeera (80.6 g% DW) and Kalabati (79.89 g% DW) and the least recorded in Nua-Purnabhog (59.6 g% DW). Per cent crude protein content varied significantly (CD0.05=0.494) and was recorded highest 7 in Nua-Dhusara (10.384± 0.294) followed by Nua-Purnabhog (9.384± 0.147) and Kalabati (8.552± 0.147). Per cent crude fibre content was found highest in Kalabati (0.984± 0.073). Cultivars differ significantly (CD0.05=0.239) with respect to their ash content with the highest recorded in Nua-Kalajeera (2.423± 0.041). The highest total phenol content (g GAE/100gm) was recorded in Jaghabalia (0.833± 0.014) followed by Kalabati (0.701± 0.001). On the other hand, the variation seen in total anthocyanin content among the cultivars was significant. The highest anthocyanin content was in black pigmented rice cultivar Kalabati (5.016 mg Cya-3-gluE /100g FW) followed by aromatic rice Nua Kalajeera (1.204 mg Cya-3-gluE /100gm) and Kalajeera (1.132 mg Cya-3-gluE /100gm FW). The least was recorded in Lall Basana (0.310 mg Cya-3- gluE/100gm FW). The antioxidant activity measured as per cent DPPH free radical scavenging activity was highest in Jaghabalia (55.324± 0.352) followed by Kalabati (48.576± 2.876). The high antioxidant activity of the cultivar Kalabati might be due to high anthocyanin and total phenol content. The selected pigmented and scented specialty rice cultivars were found to be superior to high-yielding variety Kalachampa in different nutritional parameters in the grain such as carbohydrates, Crude protein, crude fiber, Crude fat, total phenolic content, total anthocyanin, and antioxidant activity. Nua-Purnabhog, with a low starch content of 59.61 g percent DW, might be a lowstarch dietary option. It will make it easier for persons with hyperglycemia or diabetes to eat low-starch cereals. From the results of the present investigation, it could be concluded that the black rice cultivar Kalabati appeared to be a promising cultivar with a superior nutritional composition and antioxidant activity and thus has a great market potentiality.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    STUDY ON NUTRITIONAL AND ANTIOXIDANTS PROFILE OF SOME SPECIALTY RICE CULTIVARS OF ODISHA
    (2021) Bal, Rajesh; Kandali, Ranjan
    Odisha has been considered as the center of genetic diversity for cultivated rice and is endowed with numerous cultivars of specialty rice which have great market potentiality. These traditionally cultivated cultivars were rich in nutritional and healthpromoting components. However, these cultivars were on the verge of disappearing because farmers were shifting to high-yielding types, which had great market potential and provide them with financial security. There is dearth of information on the nutritional aspect of these traditional unexplored rice cultivars. The present investigation entitled 'Study on the nutritional and antioxidant profiles of several specialty rice cultivars from Odisha' was carried out in the laboratory of Department of Biochemistry & Agricultural Chemistry, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat. The objective of this study was to assess the nutritional value and antioxidant activity of these specialty rice cultivars from Odisha. A total of eleven cultivars was used in the study, out of which eight were aromatic (Rajendra Bhagabati, Nua-Dhusara, Kalajeera, Nua-Kalajeera, Nua-Chinikamini, Lall Basana, Nua- Purnabhog and, Nilabati) two were pigmented rice (black rice Kalabati and red rice Jaghabalia), and one as a check variety (Kalachampa). The moisture content, reducing sugar, total soluble sugar, starch, total carbohydrate, crude protein, soluble protein, crude fat, crude fibre, ash, total phenolics, total anthocyanin, and total antioxidant activity of the cultivars were determined. The cultivars were collected from the farmer‟s field at different places of Odisha as well as from National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha. The results showed that the moisture content of all the cultivars were lower than the check variety Kalachampa which recorded 11.914± 0.08 % on a fresh weight basis. The highest per cent starch content was recorded in Nua-Kalajeera (82.791± 0.96) followed by Kalajeera (80.605± 1.173) and Kalabati (79.896± 0.176) while lowest in Nua-Purnabhog (59.612± 0.328). Cultivars varied significantly with respect to starch content (CD0.05=3.407). The highest starch content was observed in aromatic rice cultivar Nua-Kalajeera (82.7g% DW) followed by Kalajeera (80.6 g% DW) and Kalabati (79.89 g% DW) and the least recorded in Nua-Purnabhog (59.6 g% DW). Per cent crude protein content varied significantly (CD0.05=0.494) and was recorded highest 7 in Nua-Dhusara (10.384± 0.294) followed by Nua-Purnabhog (9.384± 0.147) and Kalabati (8.552± 0.147). Per cent crude fibre content was found highest in Kalabati (0.984± 0.073). Cultivars differ significantly (CD0.05=0.239) with respect to their ash content with the highest recorded in Nua-Kalajeera (2.423± 0.041). The highest total phenol content (g GAE/100gm) was recorded in Jaghabalia (0.833± 0.014) followed by Kalabati (0.701± 0.001). On the other hand, the variation seen in total anthocyanin content among the cultivars was significant. The highest anthocyanin content was in black pigmented rice cultivar Kalabati (5.016 mg Cya-3-gluE /100g FW) followed by aromatic rice Nua Kalajeera (1.204 mg Cya-3-gluE /100gm) and Kalajeera (1.132 mg Cya-3-gluE /100gm FW). The least was recorded in Lall Basana (0.310 mg Cya-3- gluE/100gm FW). The antioxidant activity measured as per cent DPPH free radical scavenging activity was highest in Jaghabalia (55.324± 0.352) followed by Kalabati (48.576± 2.876). The high antioxidant activity of the cultivar Kalabati might be due to high anthocyanin and total phenol content. The selected pigmented and scented specialty rice cultivars were found to be superior to high-yielding variety Kalachampa in different nutritional parameters in the grain such as carbohydrates, Crude protein, crude fiber, Crude fat, total phenolic content, total anthocyanin, and antioxidant activity. Nua-Purnabhog, with a low starch content of 59.61 g percent DW, might be a lowstarch dietary option. It will make it easier for persons with hyperglycemia or diabetes to eat low-starch cereals. From the results of the present investigation, it could be concluded that the black rice cultivar Kalabati appeared to be a promising cultivar with a superior nutritional composition and antioxidant activity and thus has a great market potentiality.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    STUDY ON INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF THE VIRAL DISEASE COMPLEX IN BHUT JOLOKIA (Capsicum chinense Jacq.)
    (2021) Khaidem, Princy; Kalita, Manoj Kumar
    Bhut (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) is one of the important spice crops which is mainly cultivated in the Northeastern region of India. Owing to its traditional importance, pharmaceutical applications, and high commercial value, Bhut Jolokiais getting importance but the production of the crop has been hindering attributable particularly due the infection of a number of viruses. With the growing need for proper management approaches for managing the viruses infecting the crop, a number of management strategies have been studied in the present investigations to manage the viral diseases in Bhut Jolokia. Hot water treatment was given to CMV-infected Bhut Jolokia seeds under different temperature regimes and periods. Thermotherapy was observed to be highly significant in reducing the virus infectivity. Bhut jolokia seeds treated at 50°C for 120 minutes was observed to be the best treatment with minimum disease incidence (26.08%), followed by 55°C for 60 minutes and 55°C for 120 minutes. It was recorded that the virus infectivity gradually reduced at higher temperature with longer exposure period, but, the germination rate was declined. The effect of SAR activating chemicals viz., Salicylic acid (SA), a key signalling molecule triggering plant resistance, and Benzothiadiazole (BTH), an analogue of SA were tested on CMV-infected Bhut Jolokiaseeds to see their effect in the disease incidence. Foliar application of Salicylic acid and Benzothiadiazole at three different concentrations @200, 300 and 400 ppm each was tested where BTH @ 400ppm and SA @ 300 and 400ppm were recorded to be the best among all the treatments displaying less severe symptoms with 55.56 per cent disease reduction over control. Field study was conducted to evaluate the integrated effect of management practices like nursery net cover of seedlings, Benzothiadiazole @ 300 ppm with Biometa @ 5% and neem oil @ 5ml/L; Salicylic acid @ 300 ppm with Biometa @ 5% and neem oil @ 5ml/L; Biometa @ 5% and neem oil @ 5ml/L; Biometa @ 5% and Nuvan @ 1ml/L and sticky traps in different treatment combinations in the management of the viral disease infecting Bhut Jolokia. The plants were observed to be naturally infected by CMV and PVY, ChLCV forming a viral disease complex. DAS-ELISA, RT-PCR, and PCR were used for molecular detection of the viruses. The infected plants exhibited a wide range of symptoms such as severe mosaic, filiform, curling, and crinkling of leaves with a reduction in size, stunted plant growth with bushy appearance, fewer flowers, and deformed fruits were exhibited at later stages of plant growth. Incidence of the viral disease complex of CMV, PVY, and ChLCV ranged from 20.80 to 47.23 percent different treatments. The treatment combination T1 with Net cover of seedlings + Sticky trap +Benzothiadiazole @ 300 ppm at 2-3 leaf stage at 3 days interval for 3 times + Bio-Meta @ 5% at 60, 90 and 120 DAT+ Foliar spray with neem oil @5ml/L at 10 days interval from 30 DAG for 5 times was found to be the most effective treatment by delaying the number of days to the first appearance of symptoms with the lowest disease incidence of 20.80 per cent, maximum yield of 3.22 kg/4.5 m2, and highest benefit-cost ratio of 8.56:1.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    STUDIES ON NON-CHEMICAL METHODS OF MANAGEMENT OF TEA PESTS AND USE OF PLANT BASED FORMULATIONS AGAINST RED SPIDER MITE
    (2022) Hazarika, Bidisha; Saikia, Gautam Kumar
    An investigation entitled “Studies on non-chemical methods for management of tea pests and use of plant based formulations against red spider mite” was carried out in the Experimental Garden for Plantation Crops (EGPC) and Department of Entomology, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat during 2019-2021. The study was undertaken to survey non-chemical methods of management of red spider mite used by twenty small tea growers of Dibrugarh district of Assam and to study the efficacy of plant based formulations for management of red spider mite in-vitro. It was found that 45% of the small tea growers used cow urine with Ghora neem (Melia azedarach), Karanj (Pongamia glabra) and Pothorua bihlongoni Polygonum hydropiper combinations for management of red spider mite. Moreover, they also used bhoot jolokia (Capsicum chinense), sour curd, wheat flour in small quantities.