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Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat

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Assam Agricultural University is the first institution of its kind in the whole of North-Eastern Region of India. The main goal of this institution is to produce globally competitive human resources in farm sectorand to carry out research in both conventional and frontier areas for production optimization as well as to disseminate the generated technologies as public good for benefitting the food growers/produces and traders involved in the sector while emphasizing on sustainability, equity and overall food security at household level. Genesis of AAU - The embryo of the agricultural research in the state of Assam was formed as early as 1897 with the establishment of the Upper Shillong Experimental Farm (now in Meghalaya) just after about a decade of creation of the agricultural department in 1882. However, the seeds of agricultural research in today’s Assam were sown in the dawn of the twentieth century with the establishment of two Rice Experimental Stations, one at Karimganj in Barak valley in 1913 and the other at Titabor in Brahmaputra valley in 1923. Subsequent to these research stations, a number of research stations were established to conduct research on important crops, more specifically, jute, pulses, oilseeds etc. The Assam Agricultural University was established on April 1, 1969 under The Assam Agricultural University Act, 1968’ with the mandate of imparting farm education, conduct research in agriculture and allied sciences and to effectively disseminate technologies so generated. Before establishment of the University, there were altogether 17 research schemes/projects in the state under the Department of Agriculture. By July 1973, all the research projects and 10 experimental farms were transferred by the Government of Assam to the AAU which already inherited the College of Agriculture and its farm at Barbheta, Jorhat and College of Veterinary Sciences at Khanapara, Guwahati. Subsequently, College of Community Science at Jorhat (1969), College of Fisheries at Raha (1988), Biswanath College of Agriculture at Biswanath Chariali (1988) and Lakhimpur College of Veterinary Science at Joyhing, North Lakhimpur (1988) were established. Presently, the University has three more colleges under its jurisdiction, viz., Sarat Chandra Singha College of Agriculture, Chapar, College of Horticulture, Nalbari & College of Sericulture, Titabar. Similarly, few more regional research stations at Shillongani, Diphu, Gossaigaon, Lakhimpur; and commodity research stations at Kahikuchi, Buralikson, Tinsukia, Kharua, Burnihat and Mandira were added to generate location and crop specific agricultural production packages.

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Shelf life of Khasi mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) fruits as influenced by plant extracts, essential oils and natural coatings
    (AAU, Jorhat, 2018) Muzafary, Sayed Yusuf; Borthakur, P. K.
    The experiment was conducted during 2017-18 in the Post-harvest laboratory of the Department of Horticulture and Department of Plant Pathology, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat. The objective of this investigation was to study the effect of plant extracts, essential oils and natural coatings on shelf life of Khasi mandarin fruits and also to determine the physico- chemical and organoleptic changes during storage. The experiment was taken up in two parts .In the first experiment in vitro pathological study was taken up to test the effect of selected plant extracts and essential oils against Penicillium digitatum (green mold). The results of in vitro studies revealed that, out of the various plant extracts 100% inhibition of Penicillium digitatum was observed in Neem extract and cinnamon extract treatments. Similarly amongst the oils, clove oil, Thyme oil and lemongrass essential oil showed maximum inhibition (100%) of the fungi. The two of the best plant extracts and essential oils were selected for next experiment. In the second Experiment, Khasi mandarin fruits were treated with two best Plant extracts and essential oils (as obtained in the first experiment) alone or in combination with two natural coatings viz. Aloe vera gel and chitosan. After the treatment the fruits were wrapped in perforated 50 micron polyethylene bags and stored under ambient condition and various physicochemical and sensory evaluations were taken up across the storage period. The results revealed that during 20 days of storage period maximum decay loss was observed in the control treatment. On the other hand fruits treated with Bavistin, Neem extract and combination of Aloe vera gel + Neem extract treatments, no decay loss was observed during the 20 days of storage period. As regard the number of days taken for 50% decay of fruits; it was observed that the fruits treated with Bavistin treatment took the maximum number of days for 50% decay of fruits i.e.35 days followed by Neem extract treatment (33.66 days) and combination of Aloe vera gel + Neem extract (29.33days) treatments. Though Bavistin treatment recorded higher values with respect to physic-chemical and sensory evaluation; there was no significant difference between the Bavistin treatment and Neem extract treatment and also with the combination of Aloe vera gel (1%)+ Neem extract(10%) (in some of the observations). Since plant extracts are environment friendly and do not leave any chemical residue as against use of chemical fungicides (like Bavistin), use of Neem leaf extract and combination of Aloe vera gel (0.1%) + Neem extract(10%) can be advocated for enhancing shelf life of Khasi mandarin fruits.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Performance of Chilli (Capsicum annuum) cv. ‘Krishna Jolokia’ as influenced by organic inputs and microbial consortium
    (AAU, Jorhat, 2018) Shiriyappagoudar, Tejaswini; Saikia, Jumi
    A field experiment was conducted at the Experimental Farm, Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat during November 2016 to march 2017 to study the “Performance of Chilli (Capsicum annuum) cv. „Krishna Jolokia‟ as influenced by organic inputs and microbial consortium”. The experiment was laid out with Randomized Block Design and replicated three times. There were seven treatments consisting of T1 [RDF (120:60:60 kg ha-1 NPK + FYM @ 10 t ha-1)], T2 (Compost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + microbial consortium), T3 (Compost @ 5 t ha-1+ microbial consortium), T4 (Vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + microbial consortium), T5 (Vermicompost @ 5 t ha-1 + microbial consortium), T6 (Enriched compost @ 2.5 t ha-1) and T7 (Enriched compost @ 5 t ha-1) with an objective to study the effect of organic, and microbial consortium on growth, yield and quality of chilli as well as soil chemical and biological properties. The results revealed that growth, yield and yield attributing characters were significantly influenced by the application of different nutrient sources. T1 recorded the highest value in all the growth, yield and yield attributing characters among all the treatments. However, among the organic treatments the highest plant height (79.85 cm), number of primary branches per plant (5.6) in T3, number of secondary branches per plant (9.8) in T2 were observed. The highest number of fruits per plant (95.63), fruit length (7.98 cm), fruit girth (0.98 cm), fruit weight (1.91 g), seeds per fruit (96.68), fruit yield per plant (256.63 g) and fruit yield per hectare (12.07 t) were found in treatment T5. All the growth, yield and yield attributing parameters were significantly poor in T6 (Enriched compost @ 2.5 t ha-1). Among the quality parameters, the organic treatments recorded superior results when compared to inorganic treatments. The highest ascorbic acid content (80.90 mg 100g-1) in T5, moisture content (91.14%) in T1 and pungency (35,000 SHU) in T7 were recorded. The results of soil analysis after harvest clearly indicated that the available NPK in all the treatments improved over initial availability. The microbial population and various enzymatic activities also improved markedly over the initial value. However, soil parameter studies revealed that soil organic carbon, N, P, K, Microbial Biomass Carbon and various soil enzyme activities were found highest in T7. Economics of production showed that the highest B:C ratio of 4.60 was observed in T1 [RDF (120:60:60 kg ha-1 NPK + FYM @ 10 t ha-1)] followed by organic treatment T5 (Vermicompost @ 5 t ha-1 + microbial consortium) with 3.78. Hence, considering the positive effect on growth, yield, quality and soil health, T5 can be considered as the best for adopting at the field level to reap good economic yield with better quality, sustained soil health and high net return.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    GENETIC VARIABILITY OF COLOCASIA GENOTYPES OF NORTH EAST INDIA
    (AAU, Jorhat, 2018) Kumar, Ramdeen; Alam, S.
    A field investigation was carried out in the Experimental Farm of Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785013 during 2017-18, to study genetic variability of colocasia genotypes of North East India. The experiment was conducted in Randomized Block Design with three replications. Analysis of variance revealed that genotypes differed significantly for all the morphological and biochemical traits under study. Both genetic coefficient of variation (GCV) and phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV) were high for weight of corm plant-1 (g), weight of cormel plant-1 (g) corm length(cm), number of cormels plant-1 , oxalate content (%) while it was moderate for petiole length(cm). A heritability (% h2) value exceeding 90 Per cent was observed for weight of corm plant -1 (g), weight of cormel plant-1 (g), number of cormels plant-1, corm length (cm), starch (%) iron (mg/100g), oxalate content (%),reducing sugar(%), ash content(%); while it was low for number of leaves plant-1. Expected genetic advance as per cent of mean (Gs %) was highest for weight of cormel plant-1 (g), while it was low for oxalate content (%). Among the biochemical traits, starch (%) showed high percentage of GCV, PCV. The value of h2 exceeding 90 per cent was observed for starch (%) and high heritability with high genetic advance were observed in weight of cormel plant -1 (g) weight of corm plant -1, petiole length(cm), and all the biochemical traits. Among the genotypes, the genotype Domor-Dima had the highest yield plant -1 (2014g ) which was followed by Ahina (1871g). Among the genotypes, the genotype Kaka-Kachu had the highest weight of corm plant-1 (g) (1463g) which was followed by Bor-Kachu (646g). Association studies at both phenotypic and genotypic levels revealed a positive or negative correlation with other morphological character. Based on the performance for growth, yield and biochemical characters, Domor-Dima followed by Ahina and Kaka-Kachu were found to be best genotypes of the Assam.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    RELATIVE PERFORMANCE OF CHERRY TOMATO (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme) VARIETIES UNDER NATURALLY VENTILATED POLYHOUSE
    (2018) Gyadi, Suni; Phookan, Deepa B.
    A field investigation was carried out under naturally ventilated polyhouse in the Experimental Farm Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785013 during 2017-18. The objective of this investigation was to study the relative performance of cherry tomato varieties under naturally ventilated polyhouse. The experiment was conducted in Randomized Block Design replicated for three times. There were twelve varieties of cherry tomato viz., Roja, Laila, Sheeja, Ruhi, Cherry tomato red, Cherry Tomato Yellow, Lara, Sweet Bite, Yellow Pear tomato, Garden’s Delight, Pusa Cherry-1 and Meghalaya local in this study. Growth and yield attributing traits such as plant height, branch number, days to 50% flowering, flower number, fruit number, fruit weight etc. were recorded. The highest plant height of 5.01m was recorded in Laila and branch number was recorded in Meghalaya local (8.33) followed by Pusa Cherry-1 (8). Roja took least number of 25.69 days and 31.74 days for 50% plants to flower and 50% plants to set fruits respectively. The highest number of flowers cluster-1 was recorded in Pusa cherry-1 (44.51) followed by Sheeja (17.85). Similarly, the highest number of fruit plant-1 was recorded in Sheeja (234.87). Among the varieties, Sheeja took the least days to first harvest (82.37days). The highest harvest latitude was found in the variety Lara (97.33 days). The highest fruit set per cent of 97.91 was found in Sweet Bite followed by Laila (96.52%). Among the varieties, Lara had recorded the highest number of fruiting clusters plant-1 of 29.00 followed by 24.50 in Roja. Fruit shape index of 1.54 was recorded in Laila followed by 1.44 in Sweet bite.The highest TSS (7.10%) was found in Roja followed by Laila (6.42%) while the ascorbic acid content was found highest in Cherry Tomato Red (33.60mg 100g-1) followed by Pusa Cherry-1 (31.2mg 100g-1). Titrable acidity was found highest in Roja (0.37%) followed by Sweet Bite (0.32%). Significantly thicker pericarp of 0.38cm was recorded in the variety Sheeja followed by 0.36cm in Sweet Bite. Laila had the highest carotenoids content of 34.79μg/g.The highest yield of 60.90t ha-1 was recorded in the variety Lara followed by 60.00t in Ruhi. The cherry tomato varieties Lara, Ruhi and Roja outperformed other varieties in terms of yield when grown under NV polyhouse. With respect to quality parameters, varieties Lara and Ruhi were found to be promising as they recorded high value of TSS, Ascorbic acid, Acidity and Sugars which can be better exploited in the processing industry. Economics of Cherry tomato cultivation showed that the highest B:C of 2.56 was found in Lara followed by 2.49 in Ruhi.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    PERFORMANCE OF RADISH (Raphanus sativus L.) AS INFLUENCED BY SOWING DATES AND VARIETIES
    (AAU, Jorhat, 2018) Seth, Swagata; Saikia, Luchon
    An experiment titled “Performance of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) as influenced by sowing dates and varieties” was carried out in the Experimental Farm, Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University during 2016-2017 with the objectives: to evaluate the effect of sowing date and variety on growth, development, yield and quality. The experiment was laid out in split–plot design with three main plots and five sub- plots which was replicated three times. Three varieties i.e., V1 (Japanese White), V2 (Pusa Chetki) and V3 (Chinese Pink) were allotted as main plot and five sowing dates i.e., S1 (15th October), S2 (1st November), S3 (15th November), S4 (1st December) and S5 (15th December) were allotted randomly as sub-plots within the main plots. The mean performance for growth, development and yield characters revealed that S2 (1st November, 2016) sowing had recorded maximum for most of the growth as well as yield attributing characters viz., plant height (39.34cm), root length (31.49 cm), root diameter at top (5.20 cm), maximum root diameter at length (5.37cm), shoot weight (175.40 g), number of leaves (22.01), root weight (250.71 g) root yield ha-1 (818.06 q ha-1) and quality characters like dry matter content (19.29 g). Similarly S1 also recorded the highest quality characters viz., ascorbic acid content (18.71) and pungency (447.95μg 100g-1). S5 (15th December) sowing recorded maximum days to maturity (64.90) and fibre content (1.67g). In respect of variety, V2 (Pusa Chetki) had recorded maximum plant height (42.15), root length (27.52 cm), root diameter at top (4.65cm), maximum root diameter at length (4.77 cm), shoot weight (103.36g), number of leaves (21.98), root weight (167.04 g) root yield ha-1 (747.32 q ha-1) as well some quality characters like dry matter content (13.37 g), ascorbic acid (19.99 mg 100-1). V1(Japanese White) had recorded the maximum days to maturity (67.40), and pungency (510.71 μg 100g-1). Also V3 (Chinese Pink) had recorded the maximum root:shoot ratio (1.62). In case of interaction between sowing date and variety V2S2 (Pusa Chetki ) sown on 1st November had recorded maximum plant height (47.83 cm), root length (36.83 cm), root diameter (7.29 cm) at top maximum root diameter at length (7.79 cm), shoot weight (220.16 g), number of leaves (25.63), root weight (357.71cm), root yield per hectare (1003.33 q ha-1) and dry matter content of (28.91 g).While, V1S1 (Japanese white in 15th October) had recorded pungency of 560.87μg 100-1.V5S5 (Chinese Pink on 15th December) had the highest root:shoot ratio (2.05).V2S1 (Pusa Chetki) sown on 15th October showed the minimum days to maturity (41.03), highest ascorbic acid content(23.30 mg 100 g-1) and V1S5 (Japanese White on 15th December ) had recorded the maximum days to maturity(75.04) and fibre content (1.71mg 100 g-1 ). The cost economics indicated the superiority of V2S2 (Pusa Chetki on 1st November) with benefit cost ratio of 5.86 followed by the same variety with B:C of 5.54. Based on the results of the study, it was concluded that radish varieties, Pusa Chetki could be suggested as best suited for growing in Jorhat agro climatic zone of Assam and the ideal time for sowing these variety would be on 15th October to 1st November.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    PERFORMANCE OF CHRYSANTHEMUM(Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) AS INFLUENCED BY ORGANIC INPUTS
    (AAU, Jorhat, 2018) Bordoloi, Supriya; Choudhury Talukdar, Madhumita
    An investigation was carried out during the year 2017-18 to study the “Performance of Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) as influenced by organic inputs” in the Experimental Farm, Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-13. The experiment was laid out with 8 treatments in Randomized Block Design and replicated 3 times. The treatments were T1 {RDF(30:20:20g m-2 NPK )}, T2 {Rock phosphate + Microbial consortium}, T3{T2 + Vermicompost (2.5 t ha-1)}, T4 {T2 + Vermicompost (5t ha-1)}, T5 {T2 + Compost (2.5 t ha-1)}, T6 {T2 + Compost (5 t ha-1)}, T7 {Enriched compost (2.5 t ha-1)}and T8 {Enriched compost (5t ha-1)}. Data analysis revealed that growth and flowering, were significantly influenced by the application of different nutrient sources. Most of the growth and flowering characters were found highest in T4. and T7.which were at par. Highest plant height (112.33cm), highest leaf number (59.67) highest leaf area (88.00 cm2), highest stem thickness (1.33cm) were observed respectively for T4. Early days to bud visibility was recorded in the treatment T4 (48.33) days and T7 (51.33days).This trend was reflected earliness in colour break stage (75.33days and 75.66 days ), early days to half bloom (82.00days and 83.66days), early days to full bloom (87.66days and 88.66days) for T4. and T7 respectively .However both the treatments were at par were found to be at par during the analysis of days to colour break stage and days to full bloom. The highest flower size (17.33cm), highest number of petals (253.00), longest flower stalk (33.66cm) were recorded in treatment T4 which was followed by T7 respectively. Likewise the highest fresh weight (64.77g), highest dry weight (5.32g) was found in T4 .The treatment T4 further exhibited maximum flower duration from 1st bloom to last bloom (25.74days), highest self life (25.33days) and highest vase life (17.33days) followed by T7 respectively. Among the physiological parameters, the highest total chlorophyll content in leaf, highest LRWC, minimum Lipid peroxidation was recorded for T4 was found to be at par with T7. Further T4 exhibited maximum NAR highest LAD, significantly differing from each other. Soil parameters studies revealed that highest value for soil pH, OC, N, P, K, MBC and various soil enzyme activities were found highest in T8. Economics of production revealed that the highest B:C ratio of 2.80 was observed in the treatment T4 followed by 2.33 in T7. Hence considering the positive effect on growth, yield, quality and soil health, T4 and T7 both can be considered best for adopting at the field level to reap good economic yield with better quality, sustained soil health and high net return.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Growth, development and quality flower production of Lilium in hydroponic systems
    (2018) Baruah, Luna; Bora, Sunil
    An experiment entitled “Growth, development and quality flower production of Lilium in hydroponic systems” was carried out in the experimental site of Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat during 2017 and 2018. There were two systems viz., aggregate system and water culture. In aggregate system sand, coco peat and perlite were used as the growing media and two concentrations of nutrient solution having EC 1.0 dS/m and 1.4 dS/m were used; which was laid out in factorial completely randomized design with four replications. On the other hand in water culture three nutrient solutions at EC 1.0 dS/m, 1.4 dS/m and 1.8 dS/m were used and it was laid out in completely randomized design with seven replications. The study revealed that coco peat resulted in maximum leaf area (19.72 cm2), leaves per plant (35.84), plant height (64.41 cm), buds per plant (3.15), flower diameter (21.51 cm), fresh weight of flower (5.54 g), dry weight of flower (0.57 g), fresh weight of roots (19.73 g), root length (26.14 cm), roots per plant (119.07), diameter of mother bulb (4.89 cm), daughter bulbs per plant (3.03) and shelf life (9.81 days in water). Maximum total chlorophyll content (2.76 mg g-1 FW) was recorded in perlite. Minimum days to appearance of bud (34.38) and days to full bloom from planting (84.09) was recorded in coco peat. Nutrient solution of EC at 1.0 dS/m was found to be significantly superior to EC at 1.4 dS/m in all the growth as well as floral parameters. Interaction effect of growing media and nutrient solution was found to be significant and T2 x E1 (coco peat + EC at 1.0 ds/m) was found to be the best treatment combination. In water culture, EC at 1.0 dS/m resulted in maximum leaf area (19.10 cm2), leaves per plant (38.14), plant height (66.67 cm), buds per plant (3.14), flower diameter (20.97 cm), fresh weight of flower (6.11 g), dry weight of flower (0.54 g), fresh weight of roots (18.86 g), number of roots per plant (79.40), diameter of mother bulb (4.81 cm), shelf life (9.74 days in water), leaf relative water content (77.98%) and total chlorophyll content (2.54 mg g-1 FW). Minimum days to appearance of bud (35.02 days) and days to full bloom (84.05 days) was recorded in EC at 1.0 dS/m. Economics of production revealed that highest benefit cost ratio of 1.20 was recorded in treatment combinations T2xE1 (coco peat + EC at 1.0 dS/m) and T2xE2 (coco peat + EC at 1.4 dS/m). Therefore, aggregate system (coco peat as growing media) was found to be the best hydroponic system and EC of 1.0 dS/m as the best nutrient dose for quality flower production of Lilium.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Regulation of flowering in guava (Psidium guajava L) cv. Lucknow – 49
    (AAU, Jorhat, 2018) Saikia, Divyashree; Kotoky, U.
    The present investigation entitled “Regulation of flowering in guava (Psidium guajava L) cv. Lucknow – 49” was conducted in the Experimental Farm and Laboratory, Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat during 2016-2018. A total of 6 (six) treatments with four replications and two seasons (rainy and winter) were laid out in a Randomized Block Design. The treatments comprised of T1 – Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA at 100 ppm), T2 – Naphthalene acetamide (NAD at 40 ppm), T3 – Naphthalene acetamide (NAD at 60 ppm), T4 - Urea (2%), T5 – Urea (5%) and T6 – Urea (10%). All the treatments were applied during the flowering in the month of April, 2017 with the objectives to standardize the regulation of flowering and to study the efficacy of chemicals on growth, yield and quality parameters. During the period of investigation, the treatments showed varied response to flowering, fruiting, yield attributing characters, yield and quality of the fruits. Application of T3 (60 ppm NAD) significantly increased number of flowers (23.25) per branch, fruit set per cent (78.37%) and number of fruits per branch (19.75) in winter season during the experimental period. Reducing the fruit set per cent (16.14%) in rainy season, due to the spray of NAD at 60 ppm increased the production of superior quality fruits in the winter season. The yield attributing characters were significantly influenced by adoption of the treatments. The highest fruit length (8.04 cm), fruit girth (19.23 cm), fruit weight (162.07 g), fruit volume (144.10 cc) and lowest fruit drop (38.26%) were recorded under 60 ppm NAD (T3) in the winter season. Among the quality attributing characters, the highest juice content (48.45%), TSS (10.73oBrix), reducing sugar (3.74%), non-reducing sugar (3.10%), total sugar (6.82%), sugar acid ratio (45.46), pectin content (3.42%), ascorbic acid (264.18 mg/100 g) and the lowest titrable acidity (0.15%) were recorded under 60 ppm NAD (T3) in winter season. Studies on leaf nutrient status after the application of treatments indicateed that, the treatment T4 (2% urea spray) recorded the highest amount of nitrogen (1.52%) and in phosphorus; the highest (0.41%) was obtained by treating with 60 ppm NAD (T3). The plants sprayed with NAA at 100 ppm (T1) recorded the highest potassium of 0.36%. Evaluation of comparative economics revealed that, the highest benefit-cost ratio of 2.82 was obtained under T3 (60 ppm NAD) followed by T1 (100 ppm NAA) as 2.72. The lowest benefit-cost ratio of 2.42 was recorded in T4 (2% Urea spray). Thus, it can be concluded that, application of NAD at 60 ppm concentration applied in the rainy season found to be the most profitable treatment for improving the flowering, fruit production, yield and fruit quality in the winter season guava crop.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    MORPHO-BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ROUGH LEMON (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) OF ASSAM
    (2019-07) Pathak, Purnima; Khangia, B.
    Rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.), commonly known as ‘Gol Nemu’ is an underutilized citrus fruit of Assam. It is mostly grown as backyard crop in homestead garden. The fruit is a rich source of vitamins, minerals, flavonoids, limonoids etc. It is polyembryonic in nature and highly cross pollinated. Most rough lemon plants are of seedling origin in the region and thus tend to exhibit a wide range of variability in terms of morphological and biochemical parameters. Therefore, an investigation was undertaken during 2016-2017 on ‘Morpho-biochemical characterization of rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) of Assam to study the existing variability. One district in each of the six agro climatic zones was chosen and five plants were selected in each district, comprising of thirty plants. Wide variability was observed among the selected rough lemon accessions for qualitative characters of tree, leaf, flower, fruit and seed. Four different fruit shapes were recorded viz. spheroid, obloid, obovoid and ellipsoid. Wide variations in pulp colour i.e. ivory white, orange, orange-red, yellow were recorded in the selected rough lemon. Cluster analysis of 45 qualitative and 25 quantitative characters using SPSS resulted in grouping of the rough lemon accessions into three broad groups. Group I consisted of 17 accessions (AR01T1, AR01T2, AR01T3, AR02T1, AR02T2, AR02T3, AR02T4, AR03T2, AR03T3, AR04T4, AR05T1, AR05T2, AR05T3, AR05T4, AR06T2, AR06T3, AR06T5) of all locations. Group II consisted of six accessions (AR01T5, AR03T1, AR03T4, AR03T5, AR04T1, AR06T1). Group III consisted of seven accessions (AR01T4, AR02T5, AR04T2, AR04T3, AR04T5, AR05T5, AR06T4). No groups were formed based on geographical location indicating that qualitative and quantitative traits were largely influenced by genetic factor. The quantitative characters of flower, leaf and fruit showed significant variation among the rough lemon accessions. The maximum fruit weight was recorded in accession number AR02T5 (144.34 g) and the minimum was recorded in AR03T1 (17.36 g). In terms of biochemical constituents, the highest TSS was recorded in accession number AR06T4 (8.87 °B) and the lowest was recorded in AR02T1 (6.13 °B). The highest TSS-acid ratio was recorded in accession number AP06T4 (2.12) and the lowest was recorded in AR02T1 (1.00). HPLC quantification of limonin showed significant variations among the rough lemon accessions which ranged from 10.42 to 24.07 mg/100ml. Among the 30 rough lemon accessions, two main groups were recognized based on 12 biochemical constituents with strong genetic similarity within a location. All the morphological quantitative traits i.e. fruit length, fruit diameter, rind thickness, seeds per fruit, seed weight, juice content, juice per cent showed significant variation among different locations. Significant differences among the locations were observed with respect to biochemical constituents except essential oil content. The highest TSS, total sugar, TSS-acid ratio were recorded in location L6 (Cachar) and the lowest value was recorded in location L4 (Biswanath). Present study on propagation of rough lemon through seed showed an average germination percentage of 87.67 % and air layering recorded a success percentage of 92.11%. However, propagation through stem cutting was found to be comparatively difficult with moderate success percentage (79.11%). Three elite types i.e. AR03T1, AR06T1 and AP06T4 were identified in terms of high overall acceptability (>8), TSS-acid ratio (>2.00), less seed content (≤10 per fruit), low limonin content, high essential oil (>4%), high ascorbic acid and antioxidant activity (>80mg/100ml juice) and thin to medium rind thickness.