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Sri Karan Narendra Agriculture University, Jobner

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Effect of Different Levels of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) Root Powder on Performance of Kuroiler Chicks
    (2022) JOGI, JAGPAL; Mahesh Datt
    The present study was conducted to observe the effect of different levels of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) root powder on the performance of Kuroiler chicks. One hundred twenty unsexed Kuroiler chicks (day old) were used on a completely randomized design in 4 treatments with 3 replicates, each consisting of 10 chicks. The treatments included the control group (T1) fed with chick starter feed and other groups were kept on basal diet mixed with Ashwagandha root powder @ 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% in T2, T3 and T4, respectively. All other management practices were followed as per recommendation during the experimental period of 56 days. The feed intake and body weight of chicks was recorded at weekly intervals for further analysis. The average body weight, body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, performance index, protein efficiency and energy efficiency ratio were significantly higher in T3 group (ARP @ 1.0%) than all other treatments. The feeding of Ashwagandha as a feed additive has not shown any significant effect on mortality rate of Kuroiler chicks. The mortality during the experimental period of 56 days was 5.83%. The highest Benefit cost ratio (1.81) was observed in T3 group followed by T2 (1.78), T1 (1.71) and T4 (1.58). Thus, it can be concluded that, the supplementation of Ashwagandha at 1.0% level was found beneficial in improving body weight, weight gain, feed conversion, protein efficiency and energy efficiency ratio. It can also be concluded that Ashwagandha can be used as efficient, effective and economical alternative to chemical growth promoters in poultry industry. * A post graduate agriculture student, Department of Livestock Producti
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Knowledge and Adoption of Recommended Okra Cultivation Practices by the Farmers in Jaipur District of Rajasthan
    (2022) JALTHARIA,RAJKUMAR; I.M. Khan
    Okra is cultivated mainly in Jaipur, Sirohi, Bundi, Alwar, Chittorgarh and Hanumangarh districts of Rajasthan. In Rajasthan, Jaipur district ranked first in area of okra cultivation. The climatic conditions of the Jaipur district are most suitable for cultivation of okra and till today no systematic efforts have been made by researchers in the field of study on knowledge and adoption of recommended okra cultivation practices by the farmers in proposed area. Keeping this view in mind, the present investigation entitled “Knowledge and Adoption of Recommended Okra Cultivation Practices by the Farmers in Jaipur District of Rajasthan” was undertaken in the study area with the following specific objectives: 1. To measure the knowledge of farmers about recommended cultivation practices of okra. 2. To find out the extent of adoption of recommended cultivation practices of okra by the farmers. 3. To study the relationship of independent variables of farmers with their knowledge and extent of adoption of recommended cultivation practices of okra. 4. To identify the constraints perceived by the farmers in adoption of recommended cultivation practices of okra.The present study was conducted purposely in selected Jaipur district of Rajasthan. Out of total 21 tehsils in Jaipur district of Rajasthan, two tehsils namely Jamwaramgarh and Kotputli have been selected purposely on the basis of maximum area of okra. Five gram panchayats from each selected tehsil having maximum area under okra cultivation i.e. a total of 10 gram panchayats were selected purposely. Two villages from each selected gram panchayats were selected on the basis of maximum area under okra cultivation. Thus, a total of 20 villages were selected for the present investigation. From each villages, 6 okra growers growing okra in at least 0.1 ha area were selected on the basis of simple random sampling technique. Thus, total 120 farmers were selected for present study. The data were collected by personal interview method by using a schedule specially developed for the study after getting expert‟s opinion. The data so collected were classified, tabulated and statistically analysed, which led to the following findings 1. Majority of respondents i.e. 74.17 per cent fell in medium knowledge level group whereas 13.33 per cent okra growers were observed in the high knowledge level group and remaining 12.50 per cent respondents possessed low level of knowledge about recommended cultivation practices of okra. The findings of the study also indicated that majority of okra growers had adequate knowledge regarding “Time of sowing” followed by “Soil and field preparation”, “Harvesting”, “Seed rate and recommended spacing”, whereas they had medium knowledge regarding “Use of high yielding varieties”, “Seed treatment”, “Weed management”, “Fertilizer application”, “Irrigation management” and “Plant protection measures”. 2. Majority of respondents i.e. 70.83 per cent were in medium level of adoption group, whereas 15.83 per cent respondents were in high adoption group and remaining 13.34 per cent okra growers were observed in the category of low level of adoption. The findings of the study also indicated that farmers had adequate adoption regarding “Time of sowing” followed by “Soil and field preparation”, “Harvesting”, “Seed rate and recommended spacing”, whereas they had medium adoption regarding “Use of high yielding varieties”, “Seed treatment”, “Weed management”, “Fertilizer application”, “Irrigation management” and “Plant protection measures”. 3. The education, annual income, extension contact, social participation, farming experience and cropping pattern of okra growers had positive and significant relationship with their knowledge about okra cultivation practices. Whereas their age and land holding were found to be positively and non-significantly related with their knowledge level of okra cultivation practices. It was also found that their education, annual income, extension contact, social participation, farming experience and cropping pattern were found to have positive and significant relationship with their extent of adoption of okra cultivation practices, whereas their age and land holding were found to have a positive and non-significant relationship with their extent of adoption of okra cultivation practices. 4. Majority of respondents i.e. 70.00 per cent fell in medium constraint perceptors group, whereas 16.67 per cent in high and remaining 13.33 per cent respondents were observed in the group of low constraint perceptors. The study also indicated that in input constraints, “Unavailability of recommended chemical for plant protection measures” and “High cost of insecticides and pesticides” in technical constraints, “Lack of knowledge about plant protection” and “Poor knowledge about doses of chemical fertilizers” in financial constraints, “High cost of inputs” and “High cost of seeds of high yielding varieties” and in marketing constraints, “Lack of storage facilities” and “High cost of transportation” were perceived as the most severe constraints by the okra growers
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Effect of Organic Manures and Mulching on Growth, Yield and Quality of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.)
    (2022) Rathore, Pooja; S.P. Singh
    A field experiment entitled „„Effect of Organic Manures and Mulching on Growth, Yield and Quality of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.)” was conducted during Rabi season 2021-22 at Horticulture Farm, S.K.N. College of Agriculture, Jobner, Jaipur (Rajasthan). The experiment comprised of sixteen treatment combinations including four treatments of organic manures (Control, FYM @ 9 t/ha, vermicompost @ 3 t/ha and poultry manure @ 3.6 t/ha) and four treatments of mulching (Control, saw dust @ 10 t/ha, plastic mulch and wheat straw @ 5 t/ha) were taken in Factorial Randomized Block Design with three replications. The results of the study clearly indicated that application of O2 (Vermicompost @ 3 t/ha) significantly increased the plant height (17.28 and 31.19 cm), number of leaves per plant (6.41 and 12.46) at 30 and 45 DAS respectively, leaf area (272.00 cm2 ), chlorophyll content (1.76 mg/g) in leaves, root diameter (6.13 cm), length of root (25.03 cm), shoot weight (48.00 g), root weight (128.48 g), shoot : root ratio (2.63), root yield (9.52 kg/plot and 264.54 q/ha), ascorbic acid content (12.95 mg/100g), net returns (Rs 282606/ha) and B:C ratio supervision of Dr. S.P. Singh, Assoc. Professor, Department of Horticulture, S.K.N. College of Agriculture, Jobner. (2.47) except treatment O3 (Poultry manure @ 3.6 t/ha), which was statistically at par with O2 in terms of net returns. Similarly, application of M2 (Plastic mulch) significantly increased the plant height (17.66 and 31.66 cm), number of leaves per plant (6.42 and 12.43) at 30 and 45 DAS respectively, leaf area (270.44 cm2 ), chlorophyll content (1.78 mg/g) in leaves, root diameter (6.21 cm), length of root (24.89 cm), shoot weight (48.34 g), root weight (128.51 g), shoot : root ratio (2.65), root yield (9.69 kg/plot and 269.31q/ha), ascorbic acid content (12.60 mg/100g). However, application of M3 (Wheat straw @ 5 t/ha) gives higher net returns (Rs 280068/ha) and B:C ratio (2.62) except treatment M2 (Plastic mulch), which was statistically at par with M3 in terms of net returns. Further, the combined application of O2M3 (Vermicompost @ 3 t/ha with Wheat straw @ 5 t/ha) were proved to be significantly superior in terms of net returns (Rs 333640/ha) and B:C ratio (3.06). Thus, on the basis of net returns and B:C ratio combined application of O2M3 (Vermicompost @ 3 t/ha with Wheat straw @ 5 t/ha) is worth recommended to fetch maximum net returns per hectare from radish.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Integrated Nitrogen Management in Garlic (Allium sativum L.)
    (2022) Choudhary, Rajesh; M.R. Choudhary
    Field experiments were conducted under loamy sand soil during rabi seasons of 2020- 21 and 2021-22 at the Horticulture farm, S.K.N. College of Agriculture, Jobner. The experiment comprising six treatments of nitrogen management through organic manure, inorganic fertilizer and biofertilizer (100 % inorganic fertilizer without biofertilizer, 100 % inorganic fertilizer with biofertilizer, 75 % inorganic fertilizer, 25 % organic manure without biofertilizer, 75 % inorganic fertilizer, 25 % organic manure with biofertilizer, 50 % inorganic fertilizer, 50 % organic manure without biofertilizer and 50 % inorganic fertilizer, 50 % organic manure with biofertilizer) were assigned to main plots and four levels of nano urea (0, 25, 50 and 75 ml/ha) in sub plots and replicated thrice in split plot design. Garlic variety ‘G 282’ was used as a test crop. On the basis of two year results, application of 100 % inorganic fertilizer and biofertilizer combined with foliar spray of 75 ml/ha nano urea was proved the most superior treatment combination in garlic representing the significantly higher net returns (` 482860/ha) and bulb yield (194.80 q/ha). However, application of 75 % inorganic fertilizer, 25 % organic manure and biofertilizer combined with foliar spray of 50 ml/ha nano urea was also found equally effective treatment combination and fetched at par bulb yield and net returns. Based on response studies, foliar spray of 66 ml/ha nano urea was found to be the optimum level of N for garlic crop. Further, it may be concluded that application of 75 % RD through inorganic fertilizer, 25 % organic manure and biofertilizer combined with foliar spray of 66 ml/ha nano urea is worth recommendable for farmers of Rajasthan Zone IIIA under loamy sand soil to get significantly better yield (q/ha) net returns (₹) and maximum B:C ratio from garlic crop.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Genetic Studies for Heat Stress Tolerance in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em.Thell.) Through Diallel Analysis
    (2022) Madhu, Choudhary; Hoshiyar Singh
    The present investigation was conducted to analyse combining ability, heterosis, heterobeltiosis, inbreeding depression, components of genetic variance and heat stress tolerance for grain yield and its contributing traits in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell.) in two varying environments created by two dates of sowing viz., normal sown and late sown conditions at Agricultural Research Farm of Rajasthan Agricultural Research Institute (Sri Karan Narendra Agriculture University, Jobner), Durgapura, Jaipur (Rajasthan). The ten genetically diverse parents viz., DPW 621-50, DBW 90, PBW 502, Raj 1482, Raj 4037, UP 2425, Raj 3765, PBW 550, HI 1563 and Raj 4079 crossed in half-diallel fashion (excluding reciprocals) in rabi 2018-19 and for the advance generation F1‟s seed was grown at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), IARI regional sub-station in kharif 2019. The ten parents along with their 45 F1‟s and 45 F2‟s were evaluated in a randomized block design with three replications each in two environments during rabi 2019-20 for grain yield and its contributing traits. The observations were recorded for days to heading, days to maturity, plant height, tillers per plant, flag leaf area, spike length, grains per ear, 1000-grain weight, biomass per plant, grain yield per plant, harvest index, canopy temperature and protein content. The analysis of variance exhibited significant differences among the parents and generations in both the environments for all the studied characters which suggested the presence of sufficient genetic diversity. The G x E interaction revealed significant for all the characters under investigation. Significance of GCA and SCA for all the studied characters in both generations revealed the importance of both additive and non-additive gene action. The ratio of GCA/SCA variance (predictability) indicated the preponderance of non-additive gene action for all the studied characters.Overall estimation revealed that parents viz., Raj 4037, Raj 3765, PBW 502 and Raj 4079 were good general combiner and the crosses DBW 90 x Raj 4037, DPW 621-50 x Raj 4037 and Raj 4037 x Raj 4079 good specific cross combination for grain yield and its contributing traits in both environments. These crosses should be recommended for the handling of segregating generations to obtain the transgressive segregants. Sufficient degree of heterosis and heterobeltiosis were found for all the studied characters. The cross, DPW 621-50 x Raj 4037 in both environments exhibited desirable heterosis and crosses Raj 4037 x Raj 4079 in E1 while, in E2 Raj 4037 x Raj 4079 and Raj 4037 x Raj 3765 showed desirable heterobeltiosis for yield and its all of the contributing traits. The assessment components of genetic variance revealed that both additive (D) and dominance (H1 and H2) components were significant for all the studied characters which showed both components of genetic variance effective in these traits expression. The graphical analysis showed partial to over-dominance for different characters in both environments. The scattering of array points revealed the presence of genetic diversity among the parents for most of the characters. The result of heat susceptibility index (HSI) exhibited that parents viz., UP 2425, PBW 502, Raj 4037 and Raj 4079 were desired for grain yield and some other traits. Among the crosses, DPW 621-50 x Raj 4037 and DBW 90 x Raj 4037 were found more desirable for heat tolerance in most of the studied traits across the generations, should be used as promising breeding material for development for heat stress tolerant wheat cultivars. An overall assessment on the basis of per se performance, SCA effects and heterosis, the crosses viz., Raj 3765 x Raj 4079, Raj 4037 x Raj 4079 and Raj 4037 x Raj 3765 were found promising in both environments for grain yield and its most of the contributing traits. Hence, these crosses should be toss transgressive segregants for grain yield in the segregating generation and they can be used in further breeding programme. An overall assessment of the results of this study suggested that recurrent selection (Hull, 1945), diallel selective mating (Jensen,1970) and bi-parental mating (Joshi and Dhawan, 1966) might be effective breeding approaches for development of superior genotypes and appreciable improvement of bread wheat in future.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Dissipation and Persistence Kinetics of Fipronil and Flubendiamide on Cabbage and Monitoring of Insecticide Residues in Vegetables
    (2022) Jat, Hansa Kumari; Jakhar, B.L.
    Dissipation and Persistence Kinetics of Fipronil and flubendiamide on Cabbage and Monitoring of insecticide Residues in Vegetables was studied, following the application at recommended dose (40 and 18.24 g a. i. ha-1 ), respectively and double of the recommended dose (80 and 36.48 g a. i. ha-1 ), respectively, in the Division of Entomology, Pesticide Residue Laboratory, Rajasthan Agricultural Research Institute, Durgapura, Jaipur (Rajasthan) during (2020-21). The persistence study on cabbage recorded the average initial deposit of pesticide fipronil, its three metabolites desulfinyl (MB046513), sulfide (MB045950) and sulfone (MB046136) were 0.641, 0.377, 0.065, and 0.327 respectively and flubendiamide on cabbage was recorded as 0.292 mg kg-1 at recommended dose, while at double of the recommended dose, the average initial deposit were 1.077, 0.737, 0.115, and 0.677 for fipronil and its metabolites and 0.506 mg kg-1 for flubendiamide. The control sample of the cabbage show the residue of the fipronil, its three metabolites and flubendiamide, respectively. The residues half-life (RL50) values were 2.4, 2.7, 2.7, and 2.6 days for fipronil and its metabolites at recommended dose and 3.6 days for flubendiamide while at double of the recommended doses, it is 4.3, 2.6, 3.6, 2.9 and 4.5 for respectively. The waiting periods for the respective pesticides were worked out at their limit of determination (0.001 and 0.05 mg kg-1 for fipronil, its metabolites and flubendiamide) due to lack of MRL value by the FSSAI. In case of soil samples the residues at harvest time of cabbage crop was not detected in the recommended dose and double of the recommended dose, respectively. In decontamination studies, acetic acid treatment was significantly superior to rest of the treatments followed by lukewarm water, NaHCO3 5 percent, NaCl 1 percent NaCl, KMnO4 and tap water washing were recorded in reduction of fipronil and its metabolites residues. While in reduction of flubendiamide residues, lukewarm water treatment was significantly superior to rest of the treatments followed by acetic acid 5 percent, NaHCO3 5 percent , NaCl 1 percent, KMnO4 and tap water washing. Out of 40 samples of different farmgate vegetables analysed, 10 vegetable samples (25%) were detected with different pesticides residues. While, out of 40 market vegetables samples analysed, 12 vegetable samples (30%) were found contaminated with different pesticide residues. None of the samples showed pesticide residues exceeding the MRL in farmgate and market samples. Therefore, the study concluded that fipronil was the most persistent followed by desulfinyl, sulfone, sulfide and flubendiamide as least persistent among test pesticides on cabbage. The safe waiting period on cabbage were suggested as 5, 6, 3, 6 and 6 days at recommended dose and 10, 7, 7, 7 and 8 days at double of the recommended dose for fipronil, its metabolites and flubendiamide, respectively. In case of fipronil and its metabolites, acetic acid was found as the most effective decontamination process. While in case of flubendiamide luke warm water was significantly superior to rest of the treatments. Pesticide monitoring study is a continuous one and the real dimension of the problem may be apprehended only after widespread monitoring with adequately large sample size
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Effect of Organic Manures and Micronutrients on Root Yield and Seed Production of Carrot (Daucus carota L.)
    (2022) DHAKA, ASHA; Yadav, D.K.
    A field experiment was conducted to study the „„Effect of Organic Manures and Micronutrients on Root Yield and Seed Production of carrot (Daucus carota L.)” during rabi season 2021-22 at Horticulture Farm, S.K.N. College of Agriculture, Jobner (Raj.). The experiment consisted of sixteen treatment combinations including four organic manures (no manure, FYM @ 10 t/ha, vermicompost @ 3.5 t/ha and poultry manure @ 2.5 t/ha) and four foliar spray of Micronutrients (control, FeSO4 @ 0.5 %, Borax @ 0.5% and ZnSO4 @ 0.5 %) were under taken in factorial randomized block design with three replications. The results of the study clearly indicated that application of poultry manure @ 2.5 t/ha to carrot significantly increased the plant height (cm), number of shoots per plant, chlorophyll content in leaves, days to 50% umbel initiation, average weight of marketable root (g),diameter of roots (cm),length of roots, shoots : roots ratio, core diameter (cm), roots yield (q/ha), number of umbels per plant, number of seed per umbel, diameter of umbel, seed weight per plant, days to seed maturity and seed yield per hectare(q/ ha) ,carotene content in roots, sugar content in roots, test weight of seed and net returns ( 334519/ha) and B:C (3.22) ratio of roots yield and net return ( 395741 ) and B: C (3.81) ratio of seed yield seen as for compared to control and FYM @ 10 t/ ha which was statistically at par with vermicompost @ 3.5 t/ha except net return and B:C ratio of root yield . Similarly, application of ZnSO4 @ 0.5 per cent as foliar spray significantly increased the plant height (cm), number of shoots per plant, chlorophyll content in leaves, days to 50% umbel initiation, average weight of marketable root (g), diameter of roots (cm), length of roots, shoots : roots ratio, core diameter (cm), roots yield (q/ha), number of umbels per plant, number of seed per umbel, diameter of umbel, seed weight per plant, days to seed maturity and seed yield per hectare( q/ha) carotene content (mg/ 100g) and sugar content (total sugar, reducing sugar and non – reducing sugar), net returns ( 340879/ha) and B:C ratio (3.50) of root yield and net returns( 400842/ha) and B:C (4.13) ratio of seed yield as compared to control and FeSO4 @ 0.5 percent which was statistically as per with borax @ 0.5 per cent except reducing sugar and net return and B:C ratio of root yield . Further, it can be concluded that combined application of poultry manure @ 2.5 t/ha with foliar spray of ZnSO4 @ 0.5 per cent proved to be the most superior treatment combination as it fetched comparable root yield (342.87 q/ha), seed yield (7.17 q/ha), net return ( 410334/ha) and B:C (3.95) ratio of root yield and net return ( 469393/ha) and B:C (4.51) ratio of seed yield
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Economics of Production and Marketing of Milk in Jaipur District of Rajasthan
    (2022) GAHLOT, DISHA; Kharkwal, Sheela
    Economics of Production and Marketing of Milk in Jaipur District of Rajasthan Disha Gahlot Dr. Sheela Kharkwal** (Research Scholar) (Major Advisor) ABSTRACT The present investigation has been undertaken in Jaipur district of Rajasthan with a view to identify the prevalent dairy marketing channels of milk in Jaipur district, factors affecting the farmer‘s choice of specific dairy outlet, economics of production and marketing of milk and constraints faced by farmers in production and marketing of milk. Total 80 milk producing farmers were selected through multistage purposive sampling method, from two rural and two peri-urban villages of Jaipur district for the detailed study. Primary data for agricultural year 2021-22 and secondary data on animal population, livestock holding, milk production and per capita availability of milk in Jaipur district were collected and submitted to various techniques and tools for drawing the results and relevant conclusions. The prevalent milk marketing channels in the study region were: channel-I (Producer – Consumer), channel II (Producer - Milk vendor Consumer) and channel- III (Producer – Collection centre – Co-operative milk plant – Consumer). Among these marketing channels, Channel-III was the most preferred channel of milk marketing, as it was opted by 47.50 per cent of the total farmers followed by Channel-I ( 28.75 %) and Channel-II (23.75 %). A multinomial logit (MNL) model was used to identify the factors affecting farmer‘s decision of choosing a particular milk-marketing outlet. Herd size, marketable surplus, caste categories, access to institutional credit, BPL economic class, income from livestock and breed type of animals were few significant factors observed in making a choice amongst the three milk marketing channel decisions. The total maintenance cost of local cow, crossbred and buffalo was ₹ 225.64, 364.52 and 379.81/day/animal, respectively and the gross returns per animal were estimated at ₹ 256.64, 467.07 and 566.19 per day per animal for local cow, crossbred and buffalo, respectively. The corresponding proceeds per rupee from local cow, crossbred and buffalo were 1.13, 1.28 and 1.49. The overall total maintenance cost of per SAUs (Standard Animal Units) of milch animal was estimated to be ₹ 264.69 /SAUs/ hh, while the gross returns were estimated to be ₹ 389.61 /SAUs/ hh. The overall proceeds per rupee from SAUs were calculated at 1.47. On the other hand, total marketing cost was estimated at ₹ 8.89/lit. in channel III followed by channel II (₹ 5.95/lit.) and channel I (₹ 4.01/lit.). The marketing margin was calculated as ₹ 3.18/ lit. in channel II and ₹ 4.97/lit. in channel III. The market efficiency of channel-I was highest at 11.48 per cent, followed by channel-II (5.30%) and channel-III (3.77%). The farmer‘s share in the consumer rupee was estimated at 91.29 percent in channel-I, 79.93 percent in channel-II and 73.60 per cent in channel –III. Among different constraints, untimely availability of quality feed and fodder was the most serious technical constraint, high cost of feed and fodder was the major financial problem faced by dairy farmer Inadequate market intelligence was the marketing problem while lack of knowledge about well designed dairy shed was the in management constraints faced by the sample respondents. The study submits that there is need to train dairy owners about scientific management practices in rearing of milch animals for better health, disease control, and performance. Feed quality testing laboratories must be setup to ensure the quality of feed, to enhance animal‘s productivity. Farmers should be made aware about quality parameters like fat percentage in the milk, or even provided with affordable fat testing kits through Pashu Vigyan Kendras/ KVKs, so that farmers can test milk at their level and be assured about the prices they receive in the collection centres. Institutional sources should provide easy and cheaper loans to farmers for purchasing animals up to certain limit without any collateral.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    Study of Genetic Architecture for Yield and Associated Traits in Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp]
    (2022) Get, Sonu; Shekhawat, S.S.
    This experiment was conducted to study the combining ability, heterosis, and inbreeding depression in ten genetically diverse parents of cowpea in two environment viz., irrigated and rainfed conditions at Rajasthan Agricultural Research Institute (SKNAU, Jobner), Durgapura, Jaipur and the parents were crossed in diallel mating design (excluding reciprocals) in Kharif – 2019 and their F1 seeds were advanced in Summer – 2020. The evaluation trial was conducted in Kharif – 2020 in which ten parents along with their 45 F1 and 45 F2 progenies were grown in a randomized block design with three replications. The observations were recorded for different yield attributing traits and protein content. The objective of this study was to identify promising parents and cross combinations for yield under rainfed condition. Major objective of this study was to identify promising parents and cross combinations for yield under rainfed conditions. The present study reveals the existence of sufficient genetic variability for all the studied characters under both the environments. Highly significant GCA and SCA for all the studied characters in both the generations suggested the importance of both additive and non additive gene action. The GCA/SCA variance ratio (predictability ratio) clearly indicated the preponderance of non-additive gene action. An overall assessment showed that the parent Ajmer sel. and IC-2918 appeared as good general combiners and the cross Ajmer sel. x IC 2918 and CPD-119 x IC-8966 appeared as good cross combinations for seed yield per plant along with its component traits in both the environments. Analysis of the genetic components of variance showed that both additive (D) and non-additive components (H1 and H2) were significant for all the studied characters, indicating the involvement of these genetic components in the expression of the traits.The results of graphical analysis showed partial and over dominance for different characters in irrigated and rainfed conditions. The dispersed array point showed the presence of satisfactory diversity among the parents. An overall assessment based on the per se performance, SCA effects, heterosis and heterobeltiosis revealed that the cross IC-8966 x CAZC-10 in both the environments and Ajmer sel. x IC-2918 and CPD 119 x IC-8966 E1 environment were emerged as good specific cross combinations for seed yield per plant and its associated traits. Therefore, these crosses may be considered suitable under particular environment and may be utilized further in specific breeding programmes. An overall assessment of the result of this study suggested that restricted recurrent selection, diallel selective mating and bi-parental mating or multiple crossing may be used as an effective and alternative approaches for the development of superior genotypes and appreciable improvement of cowpea in forthcoming years