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Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University, Tirupati

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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN POULTRY PRODUCTION: A MULTI-STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY, TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2024-02) RAJYA LAKSHMI BETHAPUDI; SUBRAHMANYESWARI .B (MAJOR); SIREESHA .P; NAGARAJA KUMARI .K
    The present research work “Antimicrobial resistance in poultry production: A multi-stakeholder analysis” aimed to find out the role of stakeholders in contributing to antimicrobial resistance in the poultry sector. The study is focused on analyzing the factors influencing antimicrobial drug (AMD) prescribing behaviour of poultry practitioners and the perception of poultry practitioners about antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in poultry production, documenting the knowledge, adoption of biosecurity measures and antimicrobial drug usage pattern among poultry farmers. Consumers’ awareness of antimicrobial drug usage (AMD) and antimicrobial drug resistance (AMR) were also studied. An ex-post-facto and exploratory research designs were adopted for the present study conducted in the states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. A total of 40 commercial poultry farmers and 60 consumers were selected from both states through simple random sampling. The data from 31 poultry practitioners was collected through a questionnaire (google form) and the responses from poultry farmers and consumers were through a structured interview schedule. The findings were processed, analyzed and interpreted with appropriate statistical procedures. Nearly three-fourth (74.20%) of the poultry practitioners were young and cent per cent were male. More than half of the poultry practitioners were with M.V.Sc (54.84%) and had low level of work experience (51.61%) in the poultry sector. More than three-fourth (80.64%) of the poultry practitioners have undergone training in poultry farming whereas, the same number of the (80.64%) poultry practitioners haven’t undergone any trainings related to AMR. Majority of the poultry practitioners make use of information sources concerning the usage of antibiotics from colleagues or peers, a summary of product characteristics (SPC)/Package information leaflets (PIL), textbooks/drug handbooks and national/state guidelines/protocols. More than three-fourth of the poultry practitioners had medium level of knowledge and perception of antimicrobial resistance. Among the various factors influencing the prescribing decision of poultry practitioners, clinical or disease symptoms, efficacy of the drug, withdrawal period, ease of administration of drug and spectrum activity of drug were the most considered clinical factors. Also, prior experience in managing similar problems, guidelines or protocols on the rational use of drugs, economic status of the owner, not making a mistake, opinion of a colleague, farmers demand for antimicrobials, with the assumption that he may be called again if there is no improvement in the health status of the birds were the most considered non-clinical factors by poultry practitioners for prescribing antimicrobials. Majority of poultry practitioners expressed that hygienic management and regular disinfection of farms, practice of proper biosecurity measures, screening of flock for serological titers, Phyto biotics, prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics, immunostimulants, essential oils, special market outlets (premium price) for AMR free poultry products, creating wider awareness about the effects of antimicrobial resistance among poultry farmers, rotation of deworming drugs, certifying poultry farms using less or no antibiotics, judicious use of antibiotics and homeopathy can reduce the reliance on antimicrobials. Nearly two-third (60%) of poultry farmers from layer farms were old aged, male (100%), highly educated (75%), with poultry farming as the major livelihood, had membership in poultry associations (75%) and with medium level (60%) of experience. Whereas, majority of the farmers from broiler farms were middle aged (55%), male (100%), highly educated (55%), poultry farming was the only occupation (65%), do not possess membership in any poultry association (90%) and had medium level of experience (75%). The majority of farmers with layer farms (85%) and none (100%) of the farmers with broiler farms have undergone any training related to poultry farming. More than three-fourth of farmers from both the layer and broiler farms actively seek information from veterinarians. More than half of the layer (55%) and broiler (55%) farms had neighbouring farms and majority of layer farms possessed medium flock size (90%) with medium level of egg production (90%). Whereas, majority (85%) of broiler farms possess low flock size. Majority of the farmers from the layer (90%) farms and half (50%) of the farmers from broiler farms owned feed processing units. Among the layer farms (40%), most of the marketing was done through wholesale and retail, and for broiler farms (60%), it was done on a wholesale basis. Three-fourth of farmers from both the layer (75%) and broiler (60%) farms were having medium level of knowledge followed by low and high levels of knowledge on biosecurity measures. More than three-fourth of the farmers with layer farms (80%) and nearly two-third of the farmers with broiler farms (65%) were with medium level of adoption followed by low and high levels of adoption of biosecurity measures. Nearly two-third (60%) of layer farm farmers didn’t monitor the flock for serological levels after vaccination. All the layer farm farmers (100%) were consulting veterinarians for treatment of sick birds. Majority (90%) of farmers conduct post mortem examination for dead birds out of these, 83.33 per cent farmers were following the suggestions of veterinarians. Majority (45%) farmers mentioned that the purpose of using antibiotics or medicines in farms was for both treatment and prevention purpose. In majority (90%) farms, antimicrobial drugs were administered by skilled workers. All (100%) the farmers from layer farms have the ability to differentiate antibiotics from other medicines and among those 90 per cent of farmers can differentiate through generic names whereas, 85 per cent of farmers from layer farms check for the expiry dates of antibiotics prior to administration to the flock. More than half (60%) of the farmers didn’t adhere to the recommended duration for the usage of antibiotics. Half (50%) of the layer farm farmers were aware of the drug withdrawal period, but none of the farmers among them followed the drug withdrawal period. Majority (80%) of layer farm farmers were using alternatives to antibiotics like pre and probiotics during various disease outbreaks. Almost all (95%) the broiler farm farmers weren’t in the habit of checking the post-vaccination serological levels and nearly two-third (60%) of the broiler farm farmers were purchasing antimicrobials over-the-counter to treat on their own. Majority (85%) of the farmers were following the practice of conducting post-mortem examination for dead birds and 76.47 per cent farmers of these stated that they were following the suggestions of veterinarians for further control of the disease incidence. Nearly one third (35%) farmers mentioned that the purpose of using antibiotics or medicines in farms was for both treatment and prevention purpose. In majority (90%) broiler farms, antimicrobial drugs were administered by skilled workers. All (100%) the broiler farm farmers can differentiate antibiotics from other medicines and moreover, more than half (55%) of these can differentiate through generic names. Majority (75%) of the broiler farm farmers check for expiry dates on antibiotics before its administration to birds. Majority (70%) of the farmers didn’t adhere to the recommended duration of antibiotics. Majority (60%) of the broiler farm farmers didn’t heard about the withdrawal period and only 23.50 per cent of the aware farmers follow the withdrawal periods. Majority (75%) of the broiler farm farmers were using alternatives to antibiotics. Majority (75%) of the consumers were young, male (63.33%), graduates (88.34%) and with small family (73.33%) and had medium level of income (66.67%). Majority (65%) of consumers prefer chicken meat and prefer eggs (55%) and meat (43.33%) from commercial production system. Half of the respondents consume eggs (50%) daily and meat (55%) twice or thrice in a week. Half (50%) of the consumers purchase meat and eggs by appearance. Majority (60%) of consumers opined that the un-hygiene market was the major restricting factor in consumption of meat and meat products. Majority (83.33%) of the consumers were willing to pay premium price for quality meat products. Among them, 38 per cent of consumers were willing to pay the premium price of 10 per cent above the normal price. Majority (73.34%) consumers had medium level of awareness followed by low (18.33%) and high (8.33%) levels towards antimicrobial drug usage (AMD) and antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Whereas, majority (63.33%) of consumers had low level of perception followed by medium (31.67%) and high (5%) levels of awareness towards antimicrobial drug usage (AMD) and antimicrobial resistance (AMR).
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    LIVESTOCK SERVICES DELIVERY BY ANIMAL HUSBANDRY ASSISTANTS THROUGH RYTHU BHAROSA KENDRAS - AN ANALYTICAL STUDY
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY, TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2024-01) RANJANI PRIYA KATTI; SIREESHA .P (MAJOR); SUBRAHMANYESWARI .B; GURU VISHNU .P
    The present research work “LIVESTOCK SERVICES DELIVERY BY ANIMAL HUSBANDRY ASSISTANTS THROUGH RYTHU BHAROSA KENDRAS – AN ANALYTICAL STUDY” was focused on satisfaction of farmers and perception of veterinarians regarding the services provided by Animal Husbandry Assistants (AHAs) and also on strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges of AHAs as perceived by livestock farmers, veterinarians and Animal Husbandry Assistants themselves. An ex-post-facto research design was followed in the present study. Andhra Pradesh state was selected purposively covering the three administrative zones and a total of 90 livestock farmers, 45 veterinarians and 90 Animal Husbandry Assistants were selected through simple random sampling method. The data from respondents was collected through a structured interview schedule. Appropriate statistical procedure were employed to analyse and interpret the data. More than two-fifth (43.33%) of the livestock farmers were middle aged and majority (87.78%) of them were male. More than one-fourth (28.90%) of the respondents had no formal education and more than one-third (42.22%) of them were with large landholding, while 90.00 per cent of them possessed small livestock holding. The regularly used information sources were milk cooperative societies and veterinarians/extension worker among the various personal localite and personal cosmopolite channels, respectively. Whereas, frequently used impersonal cosmopolite information sources were television and newspaper. Nearly three-fourth (72.22%) of the respondents prefer milk co-operative societies for sale of milk and almost all the farmers use dung as manure in their fields. Majority of farmers sell the live animals to the farmers of other villages. About 56.67 per cent of the respondents had medium annual income. Nearly two-third (62.22%) of the veterinarians were young aged and about 66.67 per cent of veterinarians were graduates. Overwhelming majority (97.78%) of the veterinarians were working as Veterinary Assistant Surgeons and 95.56 per cent of the veterinarians were working at Veterinary Dispensaries (VD) and remaining few working at Area Veterinary Hospital (AVH). Nearly two-third (64.45%) of the respondents had medium level of experience and most of the veterinarians (86.67%) had 1 - 7 number of AHAs under their control. Majority (88.89%) of the Animal Husbandry Assistants were young and more than three-fourth (76.67%) were male. About 92.22 per cent of Animal Husbandry Assistants had higher secondary education and more than half (52.23%) had no employment before their joining as AHAs. Nearly two-third (61.11%) of the respondent’s received additional trainings other than induction training and more than half (58.89%) of the respondents had three years of experience as AHAs. Nearly three-fourth (73.33%) of the livestock farmers had medium level of satisfaction towards the health, breeding and extension services provided by Animal Husbandry Assistants. More than two-third (68.89%) of the veterinarians had medium level of perception towards the services provided by Animal Husbandry Assistants. The major strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges of AHAs as perceived by livestock farmers were greater acceptance from the farmers, AHAs are unable to meet expectations of farmers due to insufficient training programmes, utilization of mass and social media effectively to deliver the services and preference of veterinarians over AHAs, respectively. The major strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges of AHAs as opined by veterinarians were attending the farmers call promptly, lack of enough confidence in the absence of superior amid tough field situations and comparison of AHAs with veterinarians and paraveterinarians, providing services which are demand driven and location specific and inadequate guidance from veterinarians, respectively. The major strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges of AHAs as perceived by themselves were attending the farmers call promptly, scarcity/absence of inputs for service delivery, effective communication to improve farmers knowledge and rendering of services by unskilled personnel, respectively. The study unveiled the satisfaction level and perception of farmers and veterinarians, respectively towards the services provide by Animal Husbandry Assistants. The weaknesses and challenges faced by the Animal Husbandry Assistants need to be addressed.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    JOB PERFORMANCE AND JOB SATISFACTION OF VETERINARY ASSISTANT SURGEONS IN ANDHRA PRADESH – A STUDY
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY, TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2023-07) JAYABHARAT REDDY .A; SUNITHA PRASAD (MAJOR); SUBRAHMANYESWARI .B; SUDHAKAR .K
    The present study was attempted with the main objective of assessing the “JOB PERFORMANCE AND JOB SATISFACTION OF VETERINARY ASSISTANT SURGEONS IN ANDHRA PRADESH.” The present study adopted ex-post facto research design. A total of 1384 VASs were working at time of selection of research problem. The ideal sample size of 90 was determined for 1384 VASs at 95 per cent confidence level and 10 per cent margin of error. Veterinary Assistant Surgeons from all the four zones comprising of 13 districts of Andhra Pradesh were determined proportionally and were selected from each district through Simple Random Sampling (SRS). The data was collected by administering structured questionnaire through ‘Google forms,’ and the data collected was coded, tabulated, analyzed, interpreted, discussed and necessary conclusions and inferences were drawn. Majority of the respondents were middle aged, male, had an educational qualification of B.V.Sc. & AH, with medium level of service experience, posted at a medium distance from their native place, undergone medium number of trainings and had medium sources of information utilization. Majority of the VASs had medium level of work motivation, self-esteem, job stress and job involvement. As per the organizational or situational conditions, majority of the VASs perceived moderate organizational climate, organizational communication, span of control, physical facilities and their utilization, timeliness in availability of resources and workload. Majority of the VASs possessed medium level of job satisfaction under components of salary package or benefits, promotions, job nature, supervision and staff and co-workers. Most of the VASs had medium level of job performance under components of animal health services, animal reproduction services, administrative services, extension services and rural upliftment services. Correlational analysis between dependant and independent variables revealed that educational qualification, source of information utilization, work motivation, self-esteem, job involvement, organizational climate and organizational communication had significant and positive correlation with both job performance and job satisfaction of field VASs. Workload had negative significant correlation to job performance, while physical facilities and their utilization had significant positive correlation with job satisfaction of the VASs in AP. Majority of VASs perceived constraints as “ more emphasis on reports and records, lack of adequate infrastructure, lack of transportation facility for VASs for conducting special programs, shortage of skilled supporting staff or manpower, lack of realistic target fixations, lack of priority towards field problems during official meetings, large operational areas due to shortage of manpower, lack of trainings on the basis of the needs of the field VASs, lack of opportunity for participation of VASs in developing need based livestock development programs, farmers’ lack of interest and knowledge on recommended scientific practices and reliance on unscientific procedures, lack of timely and adequate communication, lack of skill based training on innovations, lack of coordination among VASs & with other line departments, lack of motivation for VAS and support from peer veterinarians and lack of good rapport with farmers.”
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    A STUDY ON TRAINING NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF BUFFALO FARMERS IN ANDHRA PRADESH
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY, TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2023-05) MAHESWARA REDDY KURRI; SIREESHA PULLA; SUBRAHMANYESWARI .B; ANITHA. A
    One of the various animal husbandry practices that has significantly contributed to the livelihood of rural people is buffalo farming. The buffalo farming is believed to be a "treasure" for India's rural economy. Majority of the rural households benefit from having gainful employment. Keeping this in view, the present study entitled “A STUDY ON TRAINING NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF BUFFALO FARMERS IN ANDHRA PRADESH” was carried out. The present study was undertaken in the three administrative zones of the state of Andhra Pradesh and a total of 180 buffalo farmers were selected through random sampling technique. The objective of this study was to document the socio-economic profile of the buffalo farmers, knowledge of buffalo farmers and perceived training needs of buffalo farmers. The data was collected through personal interview and appropriate statistical procedures were employed to analyze and interpret the data. The study revealed that nearly half (49.44%) of the buffalo farmers belonged to middle age group and two-fifth (40.55%) of the buffalo farmers had no formal education. More than half (53.88%) of the buffalo farmers belonged to Backward caste (BC) and cent per cent of the buffalo farmers were dependent on buffalo farming along with agriculture as main occupation. More than one-fourth (26.11%) of the buffalo farmers had land holding and nearly two-third (63.88%) of the buffalo farmers belonged to medium income category. Majority (80.00%) of the buffalo farmers possessed medium dairy herd size (2.152-5.808 AUE). The frequently used information sources were progressive farmers and extension worker/veterinarian among the various personal localite channels and personal cosmopolite channels, respectively. Whereas, frequently used impersonal cosmopolite information sources were television. Majority (92.22%) of the buffalo farmers had membership in one organization and only few (12.22%) of buffalo farmers had leadership in any one organization. More than three fourth (78.33%) of the buffalo farmers had medium level of experience in buffalo farming and more than one-third (38.88%) of the respondents in the study belonged to early and late majority categories of innovativeness. More than two-fifth (42.77%) of the buffalo farmers had medium level of economic motivation and more than half (58.33%) of the buffalo farmers had medium level of scientific orientation. Regarding the knowledge level of buffalo farmers, it was reported that majority of the respondents possessed medium level of knowledge about all the practices viz. breeding (59.44%), feeding (57.77%), health care (68.88%) and management (52.77%) of buffalo farming. The results revealed that majority of respondents perceived the training needs in all the practices of buffalo farming namely breeding, feeding, health care and management. Majority of the respondents preferred training on repeat breeding management of breeding practices (TNI=60.74). Whereas, majority of respondents preferred training on high yielding varieties of fodder in feeding practices (TNI=90.00%) followed by healthcare and management practices where majority of the respondents preferred training on vaccination schedule for calf and adult animals and integrated livestock farming with training need index TNI=94.30 and TNI=82.41, respectively.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    LIVELIHOOD SECURITY BY BUFFALO FARMING - A STUDY AMONG FARMERS IN PRAKASAM DISTRICT OF ANDHRA PRADESH
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2023-04) NAGA VENKATA SOWMYA BEERALA; SIREESHA .P (MAJOR); SUBRAHMANYESWARI .B; SUDHAKAR .K
    Buffalo rearing is one of the common practices in India and plays a distinct role in the economy of the buffalo farmers. The study about the living conditions of the farmers who were practicing buffalo farming as their sustenance could help to understand the feasibility of buffalo farming in improving the farmers for a better living. By considering above view, the present study entitled “Livelihood security by buffalo farming- A study among farmers in Prakasam district of Andhra Pradesh” was carried out. The research study adopted ex-post-facto type of research design and study was carried out in Prakasam district with highest buffalo population in Andhra Pradesh. Three mandals from the three revenue divisions (Ongole, Kanigiri, Markapuram) of the Prakasam district and two villages from each mandal were selected through random sampling method. Multistage random sampling technique was followed to select 20 buffalo farmers and also a sample of five farmers’ dependent on agriculture-only from each village. Thus, a total of 120 buffalo farmers and 30 agriculture farmers were selected from a total of six villages and three mandals for conducting the present research. The data was collected and analyzed by using appropriate statistical tools. Nearly half (45.00%) of the respondents were in middle age group and more than two-fifth (43.30%) of them had no formal education. Majority of the respondents were practicing both agriculture and buffalo farming as their primary occupation and more than half of them were with small land holding. Majority of the farmers had smaller livestock holding. About 35 per cent of them had high annual income. Nearly half (45.00%) of the respondents availed loans from national banks and 64.17 per cent of the individuals had membership in only one organization. Exactly half (50.00%) of the respondents had high extension contact. More than three-fourth of the individuals had not attended any training. Almost half (46.66%) of them had medium level of farming experience ranging from 10 years to 30 years. Among psychological variables, more than half (53.34%) of the respondents were having medium level of risk orientation. 41.70 per cent of the farmers belonged to medium level of scientific orientation. Around two-fifth (40.80%) of the respondents belonged to high level of economic orientation. Nearly half (45.00%) of the respondents had high level of food security index. Slightly more than half (51.60%) of the individuals had medium level of economic security and more than two-fifth (41.67%) of the respondents had high level of livestock farming security. More than two-fifth (43.33%) of the individuals had high level of social security in the study area. More than half (60.00%) of the respondent had medium level of institutional security and more than half (54.17%) of the farmers had medium level of environmental security. Slightly more than two-fifth (40.80%) of the respondents had medium level of livelihood security index in the study area. There was a significant difference between buffalo- included and only- agriculture livelihood system (1% level of significance). It was also observed that there was a significant relationship between age, education, land holding, livestock holding, annual income, extension agency contact, trainings received and economic motivation of the buffalo farmers with overall livestock security of the buffalo farmers. Major constraints faced by the buffalo farmers were lack of knowledge on record keeping (2.95 constraint mean score) in management category. Lack of trainings on processing of milk products (2.93 constraint mean score) in marketing domain. This research unveiled that livelihood of buffalo farmers was secured in comparison to only agriculture practicing farmers. Constraints faced by the buffalo farmers also need to be addressed
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    A STUDY ON PERCEPTION OF DAIRY FARMERS ABOUT ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN DAIRY ANIMALS
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2023-04) SIRISHA BORA; SUBRAHMANYESWARI .B (MAJOR); SIREESHA .P; SUDHAKAR .K
    The present research work “A STUDY ON PERCEPTION OF DAIRY FARMERS ABOUT ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN DAIRY ANIMALS” was focused on assessment of awareness and perception of dairy farmers about AMR in dairy animals. The veterinarians’ challenges and suggestions in combating AMR in dairy animals also studied. An ex-post-facto and exploratory research designs were followed in the present investigation. Andhra Pradesh state was selected purposively covering the three administrative zones and a total of 120 farmers from small dairy farms and 30 farmers from large dairy farms were selected through simple random and snowball sampling methods. The data from veterinarians was collected through questionnaire (google form) and the responses of dairy farmers through a structured interview schedule. Appropriate statistical procedures were employed to analyse and interpret the data. Majority of the dairy farmers from small and large dairy farmers were middle and young aged, respectively were male and belonged to backward caste and open categories, respectively. Nearly half of the farmers from small dairy farms were illiterate and more than one-third of farmers from large dairy were graduates. Majority of the farmers from small dairy farms had marginal land holding and equal per cent of the farmers from large dairy farms had marginal and large land holdings. Majority of the farmers from small and large dairy farms had small herd size, with cross-bred cattle, with medium levels of dairy farming experience and milk production and with low level of milk consumption. Majority of them marketing their milk to dairy cooperatives and had medium level of dairy income. Majority of the farmers from small and large dairy farms had medium level of social participation and cent per cent of farmers from both the groups didn’t attend any training in the areas of antibiotic usage and AMR. Among personal cosmopolite sources extension worker/veterinarians and para-veterinarians were the frequently used by farmers from both small and large dairy farms. Whereas, among impersonal cosmopolite sources the frequently used information sources were internet and mobile telephony by majority of farmers from large dairy farms. Majority of the farmers from small and large dairy farms utilised services of veterinarians like vaccination, disease treatment, AI, PD and availability on-call services. Majority of the farmers from small and large dairy farms had medium level of awareness and perception about AMR in dairy animals. The farmers from large dairy farms were having high level of awareness and perception than the famers from small dairy farms. Nearly half of the field veterinarians were old aged and more than three-fourth were male. Nearly two third of veterinarians were working as Veterinary Assistant Surgeons and majority had high level of work experience. Whereas, nearly half of the veterinarians from scientific community of SVVU were young, female and working as Assistant Professors and had low level of work experience as VAS in the field. The major challenges perceived by veterinarians in combating AMR were misuse and overuse of antimicrobials by unqualified practitioners and reliance of farmers on them, farmer not approaching veterinarians in early stages of the disease, not following milk withdrawal period during antibiotic usage, ignorance of farmer about the effects of antibiotics in animals, lack of public awareness about antibiotic usage and AMR, lack of data on regional antibiogram, lack of Continuing Veterinary Education (CVE) to field veterinarians, lack of focused research and studies on the effects of antibiotic usage and AMR, lack of stringent rules and monitoring in usage of antibiotics and production of antibiotic residue free products. Timely vaccination, better dairy management practices, following of milk withdrawal period during antibiotic usage, proper disposal of residual antibiotics by hospitals and farms, judicious use of antibiotics, appropriate dosage and diagnosis-based prescription by veterinarians, usage of alternative therapies, periodical screening for antibiotic residues in dairy products, Continuing Veterinary Education (CVE) on AMR and creating awareness to all the stakeholders of dairy industry about AMR and its subsequent effects, strengthening of EASs among field veterinarians for wider awareness on effects of antibiotics like AMR, establishment of quality control wing and implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programmes were the major suggestions expressed by veterinarians working in the field as well as in the university.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    PERCEPTION OF STAKEHOLDERS ABOUT THE SEX SORTED SEMEN TECHNOLOGY AS A MEANS OF DAIRY DEVELOPMENT –A STUDY IN ANDHRA PRADESH
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2022-04) SAI ANJANA, NALLAPATI; SUBRAHMANYESWARI, B (MAJOR); TRIVENI, G; VINOO, R
    An ex-post facto research design was adopted for the present study conducted in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Today, India is the world's largest producer of milk, with 22 per cent of global production which is mainly due to adoption of innovative technologies that are being diffused for adoption by the farmers through different channels. In recent past, the advanced reproductive technology i.e., sex sorted semen technology was diffusing at appreciable rate throughout India as its benefits were visible over the years in other countries. The study about diffusion of sex sorted semen technology and its attributes and consequences could help to further understand the dynamics of the status of farmers’ technology adoption. Keeping this in view, the present study entitled “Perception of Stakeholders about the sex sorted semen technology as a means of dairy development –A Study in Andhra Pradesh” has been taken up. The present study was undertaken in all the three administrative zones of the state of Andhra Pradesh. A total of 120 veterinarians and 69 dairy farmers were selected through random sampling technique. The data was collected through interview from the dairy farmers, whereas questionnaire was administered to veterinarians in both printed and digital forms (Google Forms). Appropriate statistical procedures like frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation were employed to analyze and interpret the data. The salient features of the study are as follows. Nearly three-fourth (69.57%) of the dairy farmers were in middle age group and majority were male (89.95%). Nearly one-third of the dairy farmers were with intermediate education. Majority of the dairy farmers (57.97%) belonged to Open Category (OC) and three-fourth had medium level of experience. About half of the dairy farmers had medium dairy herd size and were with medium level of milk production. The annual dairy income of the farmers in the study area was at medium level and majority of the dairy farmers (84.05%) didn’t receive trainings in the area of advanced reproductive technologies. The frequently used information sources were progressive farmers and extension worker/veterinarian among the various personal localite channels and personal cosmopolite channels, respectively. Whereas, the frequently used impersonal cosmopolite information sources were newspaper. Majority of the dairy farmers were found with medium level of innovativeness and knowledge. Most of the veterinarians studied belonged to old age and three-fourth of the veterinarians were male. Majority of the field veterinarians (57.50%) were with graduation only. More than half (54.17%) of the field veterinarians were Veterinary Assistant Surgeons followed by Assistant Directors. About half of the veterinarians were working in Veterinary Dispensaries followed by 42.50 and 07.50 per cent working in the Area Veterinary Hospital and others (DLDA), respectively. Most of the veterinarians (43.33%) had medium level of work experience and almost two thirds of the veterinarians didn’t undergo any training on sex sorted semen technology. More than half of the veterinarians (70.00%) had medium level of knowledge. About two-third of the dairy farmers (69.57 %) had medium level of perception towards sex sorted semen technology in terms of its attributes which include relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, observability and predictability. About three-fourth of the veterinarians (76.67%) had medium level of perception towards sex sorted semen technology in terms of its consequences and suitability to dairy farmers. The study reveals that innovations which are compatible and in accordance with farmers’ situations will be adopted following its diffusion. Consequences and suitability also need to be taken care of while diffusing any innovation among the farming community.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTION: UNDERSTANDING THE BEHAVIOR OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AMONG TWO VETERINARY UNIVERSITIES
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY TIRUPATI - 517 502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2022-04) VAHINI, PUPPALA; SUBRAHMANYESWARI, B (MAJOR); SHARMA, G.R.K.; VENKATA SESHAIAH, CH.
    The present study was undertaken to determine entrepreneurial intention among the final year undergraduate students of two veterinary universities i.e., Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University, Andhra Pradesh and P. V. Narasimha Rao Telangana Veterinary University, Telangana. It also aims to determine the factors influencing the entrepreneurial intention. The present research work was carried out in all the nine constituent colleges of both universities in three fields i.e., veterinary, dairy and fisheries. Ex-post facto research design was adopted for this study and a sample size of 149 final year students were selected through proportionate random sampling procedure. The data was collected from the students through well designed questionnaire using both print and electronic (google) forms. The results revealed that majority of veterinary, dairy and fishery students were in the age group of 21-23 years. Majority of the veterinary, dairy respondents were male whereas, most of the fishery respondents were female. Majority of students were Hindus, with education at private school and had nuclear family with small family size. Most of the veterinary students belong to general category, whereas half of the dairy and fishery students belong to OBC category. Majority of dairy and half of the fishery students were from rural area, whereas equal percentage of veterinary students belong to both rural and urban areas. Most of the fathers of veterinary and fishery students had graduation, whereas, most of the dairy students’ fathers were with secondary education. Most of the mothers of veterinary students had graduation whereas, dairy and fishery student’s mothers were with secondary education. Fathers of veterinary and dairy students were engaged in agriculture/A.H related activities whereas, fathers of fishery students were employed in occupations other than agriculture and employment. Mothers of majority students were homemakers. Majority of veterinary students’ families were with annual income of less than Rs.2.5-5 lac whereas, majority of the dairy students were with family income of Rs.1-2.5 lac and fishery students with less than Rs.1 lac per annum. Majority of the students were from middle class with no prior exposure to enterprise and were receiving financial assistance from family. More than three fourth mentioned that they had received curriculum support towards entrepreneurial orientation from their courses. Veterinary, dairy and fishery students had similar levels of creativity, need for achievement, locus of control, risk taking property, need for autonomy, innovativeness, self-confidence, knowledge of entrepreneurship, decision-making ability, entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial intention with majority being with medium level. Correlation analysis of independent variables with entrepreneurial intention of students revealed that creativity, need for achievement, locus of control, risk taking property and entrepreneurial attitude showed positive and significant relation with entrepreneurial intention at 0.01 level of probability, whereas, the variables family size and prior exposure to enterprise showed positive and negative significant association at 0.05 level of probability, respectively. The remaining five variables i.e., need for autonomy, innovativeness, self-confidence, knowledge of entrepreneurship and decision making ability didn't establish any significant correlation with the entrepreneurial intention among the total students studied. Multiple regression analysis revealed that, the variables family size and knowledge of entrepreneurship showed positive relationship at 0.05 level of probability with entrepreneurial intention, whereas, creativity, need for achievement, locus of control and risk-taking property had positive and prior exposure to enterprise had negative relationship at 0.01 level of probability. The remaining variables viz., need for autonomy, innovativeness, self-confidence and decision-making ability did not show any significant relation with the entrepreneurial intention of the students. The co-efficient of determination (R2 ) of the independent variables was 0.593 which means that 59.30 per cent of total variation in the entrepreneurial intention of the students was explained by the 12 selected independent variables. Orientation and motivation of students by utilizing mentor services from successful entrepreneurs during internship programmes may further improve entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial intention among the three categories i.e., veterinary, dairy and fishery students
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    DEVELOPMENT OF MOBILE APP ON PIG FARMING AND ITS ASSESSMENT AMONG FIELD VETERINARIANS OF ANDHRA PRADESH
    (SRI VENKATESWARA VETERINARY UNIVERSITY TIRUPATI - 517502. (A.P.) INDIA, 2019-10) BHARGAV KUMAR, KALLURU; SUBRAHMANYESWARI, B (MAJOR); TRIVENI, G; ASHA LATHA, P; MURALIDHAR, M
    Livestock sector has emerged as the one of the most important components of agriculture and allied areas in India. Among the various livestock species, piggery is the most potential source of meat production and more efficient feed converter after broiler. Pig farming is mostly concentrated in Northern and North-eastern parts of India as compared to Southern India. Until recently, pig farming is taken up mostly as a traditional caste occupation and also by the socio-economically weaker sections of the society which might be due to various religious taboos and beliefs. However, due to various extension and technological interventions, many inquisitive people are coming forward to take up commercial pig farming as a livelihood. Field veterinarians, the middle level extension professionals involved in the service delivery system of livestock farming community, can promote pig farming among various population sectors and aid in the development of piggery and quality production. In order to promote pig farming and also to update and refresh the knowledge of field veterinarians of SDAH a study has been planned entitled as “DEVELOPMENT OF MOBILE APP ON PIG FARMING AND ITS ASSESSMENT AMONG FIELD VETERINARIANS OF ANDHRA PRADESH” A quasi experimental and ex-post-facto research design were adopted for the present study. The present study was conducted among 91 field veterinarians working in SDAH of Andhra Pradesh were selected purposively through stratified random sampling method. The data were collected through well designed questionnaire using both electronic and printed versions and the findings were coded, tabulated, analysed and interpreted. Majority of the field veterinarians belonged to middle age and were male. Nearly half of the veterinarians were with B.V.Sc & A.H. qualification and more than three fourth of them were working as VAS. Majority of them had rural background and had school education in public schools. Nearly two third of the veterinarians had medium level of work experience. Majority of the field veterinarians didn’t undergo any training either in ICTs or Piggery. Most of the field veterinarians had membership in WhatsApp and were utilizing mobile regularly for professional communication. Majority of the field veterinarians felt that information needs on pig farming was important in all aspects. About 95.60 per cent of the veterinarians opined that breeding management, feeding management, ration formulation, project report making and marketing information were the important information needs followed by breeds (94.51%), health care & preventive measures (92.31%) and housing management (91.21%). Online android mobile application was developed covering all the areas of pig farming, on the name of PIG MASTER. Majority of the field veterinarians expressed that the developed application was with most relevant content, with very precise content, very simple to understand, having very good visual quality, was more credible, was effective in arousal of curiosity, with high information coverage about pig farming and with higher user friendliness. Majority of the field veterinarians were expressed that the developed application is with very helpful information, having high perceived utility and helpful in decision making about pig farming.