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  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    “FRACTIONS OF MICRONUTRIENTS IN THE SOILS OF SAURASHTRA REGION OF GUJARAT” 2535
    (JAU,JUNAGADH, 2018-03) Mr. K. H. BODAR; Dr. K. B. POLARA
    Micronutrients play a vital role in enhancing crop productivity and improving quality of crops. Almost 10 agro-ecological situations of Saurashtra region have been identified which vary in soil resource. Among them, Junagadh is one of the centers representing medium black calcareous soil (Vertic Haplustepts). Therefore, the research work on “Fractions of Micronutrients in the soils of Saurashtra Region of Gujarat” at Department of Agril. Chem. and Soil Science, JAU, Junagadh. To achieve the forgoing objectives whole work is divided in two parts. The part one (I) comprised regular monitoring of the fertility since 1990. Sampling was made from the soils of predetermined survey number at ten years intervals. The samples of 1990 and 2010 were analysed for fractionation of micronutrients viz., Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu as well as soil pH, soil EC, soil CaCO3, soil CEC, soil Ex.Ca, soil OC, soil clay, soil ESP, soil available nitrogen, soil available phosphorus, soil available potash and soil-heat soluble sulphur for long term changes. Second part (II) of investigation comprised the samples derived from long term fertilizer experiment initiated 16 years back on (Vertic Haplustepts) medium black calcareous clayey soils of Junagadh. The samples were analysed for fractionation of micronutrients viz., Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu as well as soil properties. I. SOIL GROUP ANALYSIS : Status and Depletion : The status of ferrous was highest in soil group MBLS in year 2010, manganese in soil group CD and DBBT in both years, zinc in soil group SBLS and RAD in both years while copper was highest in soil group RAD and DBBT in 1990 and 2010, respectively. So far as depletion is concerned soil group SBBT registered maximum depletion in iron and manganese, copper in soil group CD and RAD, while zinc displayed a variegated picture. Correlations : The DTPA available micronutrients showed strong positive relationship with percent availability thereby rendering its predominance in most of the soil groups with some exceptions. Soil properties showed a variegated picture and different relationships were found to vary in direction and magnitude in various soil groups. Regressions : The prediction models were worked out for DTPA available forms as influenced by the other representative forms in the years 1990, 2010 and pooled utilizing the multiple correlation and regression analysis. As in forms, the DTPA available micronutrients as influenced by various soil properties were also subjected to multiple correlation analysis in the year 1990, 2010 and pooled and prediction models were derived. So far as stepwise regression analysis of pooled data is concerned, soil properties could explain the behaviour of DTPA available micronutrients viz., Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu to little extent. Path Co-efficients : The path co-efficient analysis of DTPA available micronutrients as influenced by various soil properties revealed that the values of total component were very high in most of soil groups and soil property could explain only a little of the behaviour of DTPA available micronutrients. II. LONG TERM FERTILIZER EXPERIMENT: The experimentation on various soil groups of Saurashtra region as well as Long Term Fertilizer Experiment (LTFE) in Junagadh constituting soil group MBBT (Medium black, Trap basalt) clearly indicated that the predominant form of available total iron, zinc and copper was DTPA available form, while in case of manganese it was reducible form. All the four micronutrients viz., iron, manganese, zinc and copper exhibited increase over time in a long run viz., 16 years, especially available ferrous reached below critical levels. Although ferrous is the most abundant element in the earth crust but its’ availability requires suitable management at the earliest in the soils of Saurashtra region. The chemical fertilizers appeared to supplement as well as trigger the utilization of micronutrients. The dynamics of micronutrients alongwith its forms, in general, exhibited gross negative trend with varying magnitude according to soil, climate, agronomy and cropping pattern followed in the region. The combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers in continuous manner, might have sustain the crop yield. In light of high residual values in multiple correlation and regression analysis, the soil properties had little influence on DTPA available micronutrients. Based on multiple correlation and regression analysis the prediction model for DTPA available micronutrients are presented. The exchangeable form in case of zinc, manganese and ferrous had the maximum impact on DTPA available form of micronutrients. On the contrary in case of copper total form had the maximum influence on DTPA available ferrous. The picture may slightly vary with the soil groups. The path co-efficient analysis of DTPA available micronutrients as influenced by various forms revealed that total content of micronutrients had a direct positive effect. While residual forms had a direct negative effect which was because of its strong indirect negative effect through total micronutrient content.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOILS, EVALUATION OF LAND QUALITY CONSTRAINTS AND SOIL-SITE SUITABILITY FOR IMPORTANT CROPS OF JAMNAGAR DISTRICT
    (jau,junagadh, 2012-07) S.T. SHIRGIRE; Dr. S.G. SAVALIA
    An attempt has been made to study the physical, chemical, fertility status of soils, to evaluate land quality constraints, soil sustainability and soil-site suitability for important crops of the soils of different talukas of Jamnagar district. The particle density and bulk density of the soils of Jamnagar district were 2.40 Mg m-3 and 1.30 Mg m-3, respectively. The MWHC and Sat. hydraulic conductivity were found 52.16 per cent and 0.140 cm hr-1, respectively. The moisture held at 0.03 MPa (FC) and 1.5 MPa (PWP) were 0.38 m3 m-3 and 0.17 m3 m-3 whereas AWC was 0.21 m3 m-3. The soils were found sandy loam to clayey in textures, alkaline in reaction (pH2.5 8.18) and calcareous in nature (CaCO3 54.9 g kg-1). The organic carbon and CEC values recorded as 4.97 g kg-1 and 36.5 cmol(p+) kg-1,respectively in the present study. The results of fertility status of the soils of different talukas of Jamnagar district revealed that the soils were deficient with respect to available N (208.0 kg ha-1), P2O5 (28.3 kg ha-1) and S (12.24 mg ha-1) whereas, high in available K2O (405.8 kg ha-1). Among the DTPA micronutrients, available Fe (10.41 mg ha-1), Mn (18.04 mg ha-1) and Cu (1.32 mg ha-1) were found sufficient, whereas the soils were medium in available Zn (0.87 mg ha-1). The average nutrient index values of the soils of Jamnagar district were low for available N (1.15) and P2O5 (1.55), medium for available S (1.69) and DTPA extractable available Zn (2.21) and high for available K2O (2.68), DTPA extractable available Fe (2.48), Mn (2.74) and Cu (3.00). The results further indicated that the dominance of Ca++ (16.8 cmol(p+) kg-1) and Mg++ (14.3 cmol(p+) kg-1) among the exchangeable cations were observed in the soils while, among the water soluble anions, Na+ (5.87 me l-1) and Cl– (5.43 me l-1) were found in higher proportion indicating NaCl as the dominant salt in soil solution. In the present study 16.0, 17.0, 14.5 and 52.6 per cent soil samples were found saline, saline-sodic, sodic and normal, respectively. Correlation between fertility and salinity/sodicity indices of soils showed that ECe had highly significantly positive relationships with EC2.5 (r = 0. 988**), SAR (r =0. 672**) and ESP (r = 0.484**). Similarly, pHs had highly significant and positive relations with pH2.5 (r = 0.977**), RSC (r=0.222**) and SAR (r=0.234**). There was a highly significantly close correlation between SAR2.5 and ESP (r = 0.487**) and SSP2.5 (r=0.289**. Obviously, the O.C. was significantly correlated with available N (r =0.626**), K2O (r =0.179*) and B.D. (r=0.191**). All the soil samples were analyzed for EC and pH from saturated and dilute 1:2.5 extract and the following overall regression equations emerged as follows: ECe’ = 0.8146+3.7139** EC2.5 (r = 0.9967**) pHs’ = 0.0968+0.9721** pH2.5 (r = 0.9484**) Based on the observations of the present study, the soils of Kalavad talukas (Vertic Troparthents) placed in sustainable class S2, whereas the soils associated with the Jamjodhpur (Vertic Troparthents), Bhanvad (Lithic Ustorthents), Kalyanpur (Lithic Ustorthents), Dwarka (Typic Usochrepts), Jamnagar (Lithic Ustochrepts), Lalpur (Lithic Ustochrepts), Jam-khambhalia (Lithic Ustorthents) and Jodiya (Lithic Ustochrepts) were placed in sustainable with high inputs class S3. The management practices of the soils of different talukas are also discussed in the text. Comparing different indicators of soil sustainability with criteria and scoring, it is inferred that cumulative rating index (weighting factors) varied from 25 to 30 in the soils of Jamnagar district. The soil sustainability of different talukas of Jamnagar district was found in order of Kalavad (25) < Jamnagar (26) < Jamjodhpur (27) < Bhanvad (28) = Lalpur (28) = Jodiya (28) < Jamkhambhalia (29) = Dwarka (29) < Kalyanpur (30) indicating the soils of Jamkhambhalia, Dwarka and Kalyanpur talukas have more soil constraints as compared rest of talukas. The major soil constraits identified in different talukas of Jamnagar district were shallow soil depth, poor soil fertility (low O.C.), high pH, salinity and low saturated hydraulic conductivity. Alternate land use plans for different talukas of Jamnagar district under study have been suggested for their better management. As far as the cultivation of kharif crops are concerned, the soils belongs to Vertic Troparthents of Kalavad taluka are moderately suitable (S2) for cotton cultivation only, whereas, in case of rabi crops the soils belongs to Vertic Troparthents of Jamjodhpur, Lithic Ustorthents of Bhanvad, Vertic Troparthents of Kalavad and Lithic Ustochrepts of Jodiya talukas are moderately suitable (S2) for wheat cultivation, Vertic Troparthents of Kalavad and Lithic Ustochrepts of Jodiya talukas are moderately suitable (S2) for mustard, whereas, Vertic Troparthents of Jamjodhpur, Lithic Ustorthents of Bhanvad as well as Kalyanpur talukas are moderately suitable (S2) for pearl millet cultivation.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    ROOT INFLUX OF NUTRIENTS AND YIELD OF BT. COTTON CULTIVARS AS INFLUENCED BY POTASSIUM LEVELS
    (jau,junagadh, 2011-07) B. P. Talavia; Dr. B. A. Golakiya
    A pot experiment was conducted at the Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh during year 2006-07 to study "Root Influx of Nutrients and Yield of Bt. Cotton Cultivars as Influenced by Potassium Levels", whereas the field experiment was conducted at the Instructional Farm of the College of Agriculture, J.A.U., Junagadh to study "Effect of Cultivars and Potassium on Yield of Bt. Cotton" during year 2007-08. The object was to assess the effect of variety and potassium on dry matter yield, concentration and uptake of nutrients, root influx of NPK, yield attributing characters, yield and quality of Bt. cotton and soil available nutrients. For pot experiment, total 20 treatment combinations consisting of five Bt cotton varieties approved by Government of Gujarat / India and four levels of K(0, 80,120 and 160 kg ha-1) and replicated thrice for each stage were tested. While, total 15 treatment combinations comprised of five Bt cotton variety (As per pot experiment) and three levels of potassium (0, 80, 120, kg ha-1) were tested under field condition and replicated four times. Under pot experiment, the dry matter yield of shoot, root and total plant at 30, 60, 90 and 120 days were influenced significantly by different varieties viz., Ankur-165, Vikram-5, Shakti-7, Rashi-2 and Mico-162 of Bt. cotton. Almost, the dry matter yield of shoot and root parts of plant and total plant dry matter recorded highest values with a variety V4 (Rashi-2) followed by Mico-162. The dry weight of all growth parameters increased with increasing levels of potash at all the growth periods. The cumulative dry weight of the plant was increased with age of plant. The maximum dry matter accumulation was obtained onwards to 90 days to till maturity. The concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in shoot, root and in seed cotton did not influenced significantly by varieties of Bt. cotton. The concentration of K in the shoot and root at 30, 60, 90 and 120 days increased with increasing levels of potassium application. The concentration of potassium in seed cotton was higher at 160 kg K2O ha-1, while, the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus was not influenced by potassium application. The average concentration of nitrogen in shoot and root of Bt. cotton was 2.52 and 0.89 % at 30 days, 2.32 and 0.84 % at 60 days, 1.93 and 0.98 % at 90 days and 1.54 and 0.88 % at 120 days growth period, respectively. The uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium by shoot and root of plant and their total uptake at different growth stages as well as by seed cotton was influenced significantly by varieties of Bt. cotton except NPK uptake at 30 and 90 days of growth. Almost, the maximum uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium by shoot and root of plant and their total uptake was recorded with variety V4 (Rashi-2). The uptake of NPK by shoot, root and their total uptake at different growth stages recorded significantly higher under the application of potash @ 160 kg ha-1. The average total uptake (g plant-1) of nitrogen was 0.176, 1.223, 2.684 and 5.758, phosphorus was 0.017, 0.131, 0.282 and 0.413 and potassium was 0.112, 0.884, 2.441 and 2.798 g plant-1 at 30, 60, 90 and 120 days of growth, respectively. At initial stages (30 DAS), the variety V2 (Vikram-5) showed higher values of root radius and root volume whereas the root length was higher with variety V4 (Rashi-2). Almost, all root parameters were higher with variety V4 i.e. Rashi-2 in advanced stages. Root parameters like root radius, root volume and root length were affected significantly by potassium level at all growth stages except the root length at 90 and 120 DAS but exhibited inconsistent trend with potassium level. Root influx of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium as influenced by the varieties of Bt. cotton at 30-60 and 90-120 days growth period were recorded higher with variety V4 (Rashi-2) but remained unaffected at 60-90 DAS. The application of K produced significant effect on root influx of N, P and K at 30-60 DAS and K at 90-120 DAS, while root influx of N, P and K at 60-90 DAS remained unaffected. The root influx of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium was observed in range of 7.94 – 14.82 (N x 10-7), 1.24 – 3.34 (P x 10-7) and 10.60 – 19.91 (K x 10-7) mg cm-1 sec-1 at 30-60, 60-90 and 90-120 days growth period. The root influx of K was recorded maximum at 30-60 days (initial stage) as compared to both later stages (60-90 DAS and 90-120 DAS) of crop. Among the various varieties, the variety V4 (Rashi-2) showed higher number of sympodia branches per plant (11.75), monopodia branches per plant (3.88), bolls per plant (23.64) and boll weight (6.13) lint (44.03 g plant-1), seed yield (84.89 g plant-1) and seed cotton yield (128.92 g plant-1).While, the ginning percentage and oil content were significantly higher with V3 (Shakti-2) and V2 (Vikram-5), respectively. The application of potassium @ 160 kg ha-1 produced significantly higher sympodia per plant (11.0), bolls per plant(21.85), boll weight (6.00 g), lint yield (41.21 g plant-1), seed yield (76.79 g plant-1), seed cotton yield (118.00 g plant-1), ginning percentage (37.74%) and oil content (17.91%). Under field, the concentration of K in dry matter at 60 DAS and stalk at harvest was varied significantly for different varieties and it was recorded higher with variety Vikram-5,while the concentration of NP in dry matter and stalk and NPK seed cotton remained unaffected. The uptake of K by dry matter at 60 DAS and stalk and its total uptake was higher with variety V5 (Mico-162). The concentration of K in dry matter, stalk and seed cotton were recorded higher under the application of potash @ 120 kg ha-1 in value of 1.097, 1.041 and 0.982 per cent, respectively. The uptake of N (46.95 kg ha-1), P (6.52 kg ha-1) and K (27.73 kg ha-1) by dry matter at 60 days was recorded higher at 120 kg K2O ha-1 . Similarly, the application of potassium @ 120 kg ha-1 registered significantly higher uptake of N, P and K by seed cotton (62.05, 6.63 and 38.74 kg ha-1) and P and K by stalk (8.35 and 25.51 kg ha-1) by seed cotton. Almost, similar trend was observed for total uptake of NPK. The variety V4 (Rashi-2) recorded significantly higher bolls per plant (37.00) , boll weight (6.38 g) , dry matter yield (2633 kg ha-1), lint yield (906 kg ha-1), seed cotton yield (2626 kg ha-1) and total cotton yield (6419 kg ha-1). Similarly, the higher value of micronair (4.752), stepple length (2.839 cm) and 2.5% span length (2.917) were recorded with variety V4 (Rashi-2). Fertilization of potassium @ 120 kg ha-1 gave significantly higher dry matter (2534 kg ha-1), lint yield (908 kg ha-1), seed cotton yield (2597 kg ha-1), stalk yield (3728 kg ha-1) and total cotton yield (6325 kg ha-1). Similarly, Quality parameters viz., micronair (4.119), stepple length (2.811 cm), span length (2.879 per cent), oil content (18.12 per cent) and ginning percentage (34.96 per cent) were higher under application of potassium @ 120 kg ha-1. The availability of NPK in soil at 60 days growth period and at harvest was not influenced significantly by varieties of Bt. cotton. The application of potassium @ 120 kg ha-1 produced significant effect only on availability of potassium in soil at 60 days growth stage and at harvest and it was recorded higher under application of potassium @ 120 kg ha-1. The Bt. cotton variety Rashi-2 out yielded over rest of the varieties in pot and field experiments. The root parameters and yield and quality attributes were also recorded with higher values in case of the cotton variety Rashi-2. The varieties did not differed significantly with respect to the total concentrations of NPK even though they have significant variations in the root parameters. However, in case of total nutrient uptake the variety Rashi-2 observed maximum NPK, might be because of higher yield, root influx of NPK as influenced by K levels exhibited varietal variations being maximum with Rashi-2 at least during initial (30-60 DAS) and later (80-120) stages. The root influx of NPK remained unaffected by the levels of K during 60-90 DAS. In the field experiment the crop variety Vikram-5 recorded higher K content at 60 DAS. But tested K uptake was higher with Mico-162. The K uptake followed the trend of K application levels. However, Rashi-2 out performed over rest of the varieties by recording highest yield, yield attributes and quality parameters under 120 kg ha-1 of K application.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    RESPONSE OF ZINC AND IRON ON YIELD AND NUTRIENT COMPOSITION OF OKRA (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench)
    (jau,junagadh, 2011-05) Anjali Ghritlahare; Dr. P. J. Marsonia
    The present experiment entitled, “Response of zinc and iron on yield and nutrient composition of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench)” was carried out during the kharif season of the year 2010 at Instructional Farm, Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh. The experiment was laid out in the factorial randomized block design with four replications and nine treatment combinations, considering three levels each of zinc (0, 25 and 50 kg ZnSO4 ha-1) and iron (0, 25 and 50 kg FeSO4 ha-1). The results of experiment indicated that, among different levels of ZnSO4 (0, 25 and 50 kg ha-1), 50 kg ZnSO4 ha-1 significantly increased plant height (88 cm), number of leaves (14) per plant, immature green fruit girth (6.09 cm), immature green fruit yield (2888 kg ha-1), dry pod yield (664 kg ha-1), stalk yield (2215 kg ha-1) and protein content (22.93 %) at harvest. Among different levels of FeSO4 (0, 25 and 50 kg ha-1), application of 50 kg FeSO4 ha-1 significantly increased number of leaves (14) per plant, immature green fruit girth (6.00 cm), immature green fruit yield (2934 kg ha-1), dry pod yield (675 kg ha-1), stalk yield (2204 kg ha-1) and protein content (23.14 %) at harvest of okra. The application of ZnSO4 did not produced any significant effect on content of all the nutrients in stalk at all the growth stages and its content in pod except S and Zn content at 30, 60, at harvest and in pod. The significantly higher S content (0.596, 0.538, 0.327 and 0.455 %) and Zn content (133, 149, 206 and 119 mg kg-1) in stalk at 30, 60, at harvest and in pod with the soil application of 50 kg ZnSO4 ha-1, respectively. The application of FeSO4 did not produced any significant effect on content of all the nutrients in stalk at all the growth stages and its content in pod except S and Fe content at in stalk 30, 60, at harvest and in pod. The significantly higher S content (0.585, 0.537, 0.324 and 0.455 %) and Fe content (1193, 1284, 1027 and 298 mg kg-1) in stalk at 30, 60, at harvest and in pod with the soil application of 50 kg FeSO4 ha-1, respectively. The application of 50 kg ZnSO4 ha-1 significantly increased the uptake of P (2.05, 4.53 and 6.59 kg ha-1), S (2.18, 10.08 and 12.26 kg ha-1), Zn (137, 263 and 400 g ha-1) and Mn (35.10, 320.57 and 356 g ha-1) by pod, stalk and its total uptake by okra crop, respectively as compared to control. While significantly increased in uptake of N (15.38 and 44.3 kg ha-1), K (11.17 and 30.95 kg ha-1) and Cu (8.28 and 40 g ha-1) by pod and its total uptake, respectively and Fe (2230 and 2418 g ha-1) by stalk and its total uptake with soil application of 50 Kg ZnSO4 ha-1, respectively. The application of 50 kg FeSO4 ha-1 significantly increased the uptake of S (2.19, 10.03 and 12.23 kg ha-1) and Fe (202, 2265 and 2466 g ha-1) by pod, stalk and its total uptake by okra crop, respectively as compared to control. While significantly increased in uptake of N (15.69 and 44.8 kg ha-1), P (2.07 and 6.55 kg ha-1), K (11.74 and 30.95 kg ha-1), Zn (135 and 388 g ha-1), Cu (8.40 and 40 g ha-1) and Mn (35.79 and 318.13 g ha-1) by pod and its total uptake with application of 50 kg FeS04 ha-1, respectively. The effect of zinc application on soil parameter like EC, pH and OC, available soil N, P2O5 and K2O and DTPA extractable Fe, Mn and Cu content in soil were observed non-significant. While the application of ZnSO4 @ 50 kg ha-1 resulted in significantly higher Zn content (1.10 mg kg-1) and S content (18.2 mg kg-1) in soil after harvest of okra crop. The effect of iron application on soil parameter like EC, pH and OC, available in soil N, P2O5 and K2O and DTPA extractable Zn, Mn and Cu content in soil were observed non-significant. While the application of FeSO4 @ 50 kg ha-1 resulted in significantly higher Fe content (8.43 mg kg-1) and S content (17.8 mg kg-1) in soil after harvest of okra crop. The interaction effects of zinc and iron on yield and yield attributing characters, content and uptake of all the nutrients and on available nutrients in soil after harvest of crop found non- significant.
  • ThesisItemOpen Access
    COMPARATIVE APPRAISAL OF VARIOUS SOURCES OF BORON WITH RESPECT TO RELEASE OF BORON AND ITS EFFECT ON GROUNDNUT (Arachis hypogaea L.) YIELD
    (jau,junagadh, 2009-09) P. J. Rathod; Dr. N. M. Zalawadia
    The crop response to boron in the soils of Saurashtra is enigmatic. Since the soils are calcareous in nature the various pools of boron and its availability in soil are not clearly understood. Keeping this in mind, the present investigation was taken up in two parts. In the first part, an incubation study was undertaken during Kharif 2007 to know the effect of different sources (Agricol, Borax and Boric acid) and levels (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 ppm) of boron at various incubation periods (15th, 30th, 45th, 60th, 75th, and 90th day) on boron availability. Another part of the investigation was a pot study conducted during Summer 2008 to know the effect of different sources (Agricol, Borax and Boric acid) and levels of boron (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 ppm) on groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) yield, yield attributes, concentration and uptake of N, P, K, B, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu, and their availability in post harvest soil. Both the experimental soils were Vertic Haplustepts medium black calcareous clayey. The time of incubation had the pronounced effect on boron availability. The boron availability of each product increased up to 45th days of incubation period, and then it was decreased. Availability of boron seems to have direct relationship with the quantity of applied boron. Thus, the overall availability of boron increased with the increasing dose of applied boron sources. Among the different sources of boron, the rate of release of available boron was highest in Boric acid followed by Borax and Agricol. The interaction effect of different sources and periods was found significant. The highest availability of boron was registered at 45th days of incubation period with 10 ppm Boric acid treatment. While, the pot culture study showed the different sources of boron significantly increased the haulm, kernel and shell yield of groundnut crop. The maximum plant height, number of mature pods, haulm, kernel and shell yield were observed with Boric acid. The quality parameters like oil content in kernel significantly improved by different sources. The maximum N, P, K, B, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu content and their uptake by haulm, kernel and shell were observed with Boric acid, except N and P content in shell and K content in haulm and shell. Among the different sources, Boric acid significantly increased the accumulation of N, P, K, B, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu in haulm, kernel and shell except P uptake by haulm and shell. The soil reaction was observed significantly lowest with Boric acid treatments in soil. The significantly highest salt content (EC) and organic carbon content were observed with the application of Boric acid in soils. Among the different sources of boron, Boric acid significantly improved the availability of nutrients (N, P, B, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) in soils. The application of boron significantly increased plant height, number of mature pods, haulm, kernel and shell yield of groundnut crop. The significantly highest concentration of N, P, K, B, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu content in haulm, kernel and shell were observed with the application of 1.5 ppm level of boron, except P and K content in shell. The boron application significantly improved the accumulation of N, P, K, B, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu in haulm, kernel and shell of groundnut crop. The soil reaction was observed significantly lowest with application of boron @ 1.5 ppm in soil. The maximum salt content (EC) and organic carbon content were observed with the application of boron @ 1.5 ppm in soil. Among the different levels of boron, the application of 1.5 ppm boron significantly improved the availability of nutrients (N, P, B, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) in soil. The significant interaction effect of sources and levels of boron was observed in case of dry matter production (pod and kernel), content (N content in kernel and P content in haulm) and uptake (N and K uptake by kernel). The interaction of available nitrogen content in soil was also found significant.