Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://krishikosh.egranth.ac.in/handle/1/5810001028
Authors: Gawali, Miss Shital Pundlik
Advisor: Munjal, Dr.S.V
Kale, Dr.A.A
Lad, Dr.B.L
Jambagni, Dr.B.M
Title: STUDIES ON LEVELS OF SOME ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES AND PROLINE ACCUMULATION IN FIELD GROWN CHICKPEA CULTIVARS IN RESPONSE TO IMPOSED WATER STRESS
Publisher: MAHATMA PHULE KRISHI VIDYAPEETH, RAHURI - 413 722, DIST. AHMEDNAGAR, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA
Language: en
Type: Thesis
Agrotags: sowing, intercropping, wheats, tillage equipment, seed drilling, crops, mustard, fertilizers, land resources, chickpeas
Abstract: A field experiment was conducted during rabi season of 2005-06 with eight chickpea cultivars viz., PG-96006, PG- 00109, C-235, Vijay, PG-5, Digvijay, PG-97586-2 and Viratobtained from AICPIP, M.P.K.V., Rahun in order to evaluate thebiochemical and physiological changes in leaves due to imposedwater stress. The cultivars were grown in ramout shelter withtwo replications. The water stress was imposed by withholding water and measuring soil moisture content, whereas the controlplants were irrigated at an interval of 25-30 days m order tomaintain soil moisture content at field capacity. The leaves ofcontrol and water stressed plants from eight chickpea cultivarswere collected a: seedling 50 per cent flowering and pod-~— 5 stages and evaluated for proline content and nteXVAbstract contd.... Shital P. Gawali activities of pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase, ascorbic acidoxidase, catalase and peroxidase. The physiological parameterssuch as relative leaf water content and membrane injury indexwere also studied. The soil moisture content from control andwater stressed plots at all three growth stages were also recorded.The studies revealed that the activity of pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase increased due to water stress m all thecultivars of chickpea which resulted in increased proline contentin the leaves. Further, it was found that the activity of thisenzyme at 50 magnitude of increased over control in the activity and prolinecontent was higher at seedling stage in stressed plants in all thechickpea cultivars. The ascorbic acid oxidase activity decreaseddue to water stress in all the cultivars at various growth stages The minimum activity was found at 50 per cent flowering stage.On the contrary, water stress resulted m an increase m catalaseand peroxidase activities m the leaves of eight chickpeacultivars. At 50 per cent flowering, the activities of these twoenzymes were maximum as compared to those of at seedling andpod-filtir-g stages. Further, the cultivar Yijay as compared toother cultivars showed consistency in the increasing ordecreasing trend in case of all these enzymes . . . . , ,XVIAbstract contd.... Shital P. Gawalidue to water stress at critical growth stages. The parametersunder study exhibited highest response at 50 per cent floweringstage in all the chickpea cultivars. The relative leaf water ontent did not show anyspecific trend in water stressed plants of chickpea cultivars. Themembrane injury index was minimum at the seedling stage andincreased during subsequent growth stages in tressed plants.The imposed water stress resulted m the reduction of soilmoisture content at various stages of crop growth, however, thereduction was maximum at pod-filling stage. Thus, the results of this investigation revealed that50 per cent flowering stage appears to be critical in relation to water deficit stress in chickpea. Further, based on higher accumulation of proline, higher activities of pyrroline-5-arboxylate synthetase, catalase and peroxidase and lower level of ascorbic acid oxidase and higher relative leaf water content with concomitant reduction in soil moisture content as well aslower embrane injury index in the leaves of Vijaydemonstrated its tolerance to drought and could be used as a check for evaluating other chickpea cultivars for droughttolerance under field conditions.
Subject: Agricultural Biochemistry
Theme: Agricultural Biochemistry
These Type: M.Sc
Issue Date: 2006-05-31
Appears in Collections:Thesis

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